Hotels in Florida

This 1926 Mediterranean-style historic landmark that anchors Coral Gables still feels very Old Florida. The palm-adorned central courtyard's gurgling fountain and grand entrance-inspiring lobby have seen the likes of Judy Garland, Bing Crosby, and an assortment of Vanderbilts.

Located just two blocks from the beach and a five- to ten-minute walk from local clubs and restaurants, the Clinton Hotel has become popular with vacationers in their twenties and thirties.

Owned by Italian clothing company Diesel, the Pelican Hotel is an eclectic property in the midst of Ocean Drive’s bustling nightlife scene.

Located near the old port, the hotel is a superb bargain; rooms are large and bright with modern furniture and floral accents, though there’s no on-site pool or restaurant.

True to its surfer-cool, 1950’s-motel roots, The new Postcard Inn, in St. Pete Beach, Florida, is hip, affordable, and resolutely casual.

The Catalina takes the value-added approach to South Beach nightlife and succeeds without feeling cheap or cheesy. Guests receive free VIP passes to clubs like Mansion and free frozen mojitos during the daily cocktail hour, served under the thatched roof of the Tiki Bar or in the sleek Red Bar.

Just two blocks from the St. Johns River, this three-story home has been carefully restored since it was built in 1902 as the home of a well-to-do entrepreneur. A pitched gable roof shelters the 600-square-foot main house, which has six uniquely decorated rooms.

The hotel has four-person suites with full kitchenettes—plus monkeys and the chance to swim with manatees!

Just 20 minutes from downtown Orlando, the Bay Hill Club & Lodge is owned by golf legend Arnold Palmer, also known as the King. Winner of the PGA Tour Lifetime Achievement Award, Palmer still lives and plays on the resort during the winter.

While most guests book their stay at Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek to visit neighboring Disney World, anywhere else, the hotel would be a destination unto itself.

If only all family-geared Orlando hotels were so fully conceived.

With at least 80 inns and B&B's squeezed onto the eight-square-mile island, Key West may well be America's most "inn" town. So what makes the Mermaid & the Alligator stand out?

Registered with the Palm Beach Preservation Foundation as a historic landmark, the Chesterfield’s iconic white building has been used as a hotel since 1926.