Florida Keys

Florida Keys Travel Guide

Resting within the central Floriday Keys, Lignumvitae Key Botanical State Park is home to one of the Key's last tropical hardwood hammock forests. William J.

Cuban cigars are embargoed in the United States, so buy a legal version at this warren-like shop directly across from Mallory Square.

Owned by a Key West native who stocks her well-appointed accessories boutique with candles from Diptyque and Tocca, antique clocks, spicy red pepper–flavored Belgian chocolates, and enough Dr. Hauschka and Kiehls beauty products to keep you moisturized for life.

Book a snorkeling trip à deux to view a multicolored swirl of marine life and the 136-year-old lighthouse.

The circa-1891 Key West Museum of Art & History at the Custom House features a dripping-with-malice portrait of Truman Capote, waving a 1976 American Bicentennial flag and pistol, a Vote for the Man sign and a bloody young couple in the foreground: it was done by Capote’s fellow all-star of w

The Yankee Freedom II takes visitors from Key West to Dry Tortugas National Park. The 70-mile excursion aboard this high-speed-catamaran takes a little more than two hours, and guests have about four hours to enjoy Fort Jefferson and the Dry Tortugas beaches.

Check exact tournament dates with the tourist office, or if you want to fish year-round, they'll help you rent a charter.

The National Marine Sanctuary–owned museum, devoted to the largest coral reef in North America, opened in January 2007; permanent exhibits highlight the Keys' 11 habitats, the living reef, and local weather patterns.

East Sister Rock has a three-bedroom house with a wraparound veranda and a small dock.

2008 is the “International Year of the Reef,” so escape the heat while you pay homage to wonderful works of nature by snorkeling, scuba diving, or riding a glass-bottomed boat in the all-underwater John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park.

Catch an art film at the nonprofit Tropic Cinema (founded, in part, by writer Jean Carper and George Cooper, a retired law professor and author).

Captain Jim Sharp takes groups of up to six anglers on saltwater fishing expeditions in the Florida Straits with his boat Sea Boots. The boat's light weight and streamlined design make it agile in the quick-changing weather.

Get a glimpse at the ruins of an early European settlement and some secluded waterfront sands.

Pick up cartoonlike sculptures (fish in red high heels, anyone?) and bright beachscape-painted tables and chairs at this boutique filled with handmade crafts by Floridian artists. All evoke a cheery Key West sensibility.

This two-room bookstore feels and smells like an attic, but the collection of mostly used books is worth a visit. Peruse the teetering stacks for Cuban literature and biographies of local luminaries: Harry Truman, Ernest Hemingway, and Tennessee Williams among them.