Florida Keys

Things to do in Florida Keys

The coastline provides a variety of activities for the whole family, both educational and recreational – but most importantly fun. Ocean activities include snorkeling through reefs, or viewing sunken ruins, including the Christ of the Abyss in Key Largo. Ocean lovers can also take surfing lessons, fishing tours and set off on other water adventures.

There are also conservation programs and workshops, along with dolphin encounters for those keen to learn about the Keys and the natural ecosystem. Visitors can also take eco-tours or drop by the Key West aquarium for a fun and educational day.

For those whose main objective is relaxation – and who can blame you in this beach paradise? – there are a plethora of wellness centers and spas to chose from when visiting the Florida Keys.
When planning a visit to the Florida Keys, there is something for everyone: nature, adventure, relaxation, learning – and even theater and shopping as well.

The museum dates to 1834.

The Museum of Art & History at the Custom House occupies a prime location on the port, but for Art Basel–quality work, head to this one-room gallery. The small collection of contemporary Cuban artists includes vibrant canvases by Luis Abreux and painted wooden folk carvings by Mario Sanchez.

Just a five-minute boat ride from Marathon, Seabird Key is a 10-acre private island available for rent by the week. The island is home to an eight-person guesthouse, surrounded by tropical gardens; a bird sanctuary filled with pelicans and herons; and a white-sand beach strung with hammocks.

Resting within the central Floriday Keys, Lignumvitae Key Botanical State Park is home to one of the Key's last tropical hardwood hammock forests. William J.

The circa-1891 Key West Museum of Art & History at the Custom House features a dripping-with-malice portrait of Truman Capote, waving a 1976 American Bicentennial flag and pistol, a Vote for the Man sign and a bloody young couple in the foreground: it was done by Capote’s fellow all-star of w

The National Marine Sanctuary–owned museum, devoted to the largest coral reef in North America, opened in January 2007; permanent exhibits highlight the Keys' 11 habitats, the living reef, and local weather patterns.

East Sister Rock has a three-bedroom house with a wraparound veranda and a small dock.

Get a glimpse at the ruins of an early European settlement and some secluded waterfront sands.

At the improbably first-rate theater, local boy Richard Wilbur once helped out with Molière translations.

Key West natives take their nightlife seriously, though not literally, as many begin their reveling at 3 p.m. Join the party early at this indoor-outdoor martini bar; three-man bands and solo guitarists serenade fortysomethings under a shimmering disco ball.

Take a guided snorkel tour near Bahia Honda State Park, to spot barracudas and stingrays.

Spend the day at the 1850s park (don’t miss the fascinating antique desalination plant). Here, you’ll also find one of the few beaches in Key West with showers and picnic tables. Tip: bring waterproof sandals—the beach is pebbly.

This annual arts exhibit of contemporary, large-scale outdoor sculptures and installations started in 1995 as an informal exhibit. Now, it showcases emerging and established artists from around the world.

A jazzy live band accompanies the rough-looking bartenders, who serve $3 brews to a wide range of characters beneath twinkling green lights.

The famed shop produces a frozen version, dipped in chocolate and eaten from a stick, lolly-style.