Florence Travel Guide

Along with Loretta Caponi, this antique pharmacy—in a frescoed side-chapel of the Santa Maria Novella church—is one of the most gorgeous shops in

The walls of this evocatively dim and echoing Franciscan church are lined by the tombs of some of Tuscany's greatest luminaries: artist Michelangelo, scientist Galileo, composer Rossini, political philosopher Machiavelli, sculptor Ghiberti, and many others.

View the church's frescoes by Perugino, Andrea del Sarto, and Jacopo da Pantormo.

American Carole Biagiotti represents the likes of Italian street painter Ericailcane—known for his whimsical fauna-themed paintings and drawings.

A fantastic art-supply store that carries thick drawing paper, paintbrushes, and oils.

Reserve a tour of a privately owned palazzo through well-connected cultural association Città Nascosta, and you may get to meet the owner and try out the family wines.

There’s always a long line outside Florence’s Academy of Fine Arts, everyone waiting to see arguably the world’s most famous sculpture: Michelangelo’s David (1501–04).

The Uffizi contains the world's most magnificent collection of Renaissance art from the greatest of Old Masters. This relatively small gallery, occupying the sumptuously decorated halls of the ruling Medici dynasty's one-time office complex, can easily take up a full day.

The musuem has held Medici collections of Etruscan, Roman, Greek, and Egyptian art since 1870.

Originally a medicinal garden designed for the Medici in 1545, the Botanical Gardens of Florence, also called the Giardino dei Semplici (Garden of Simple), is one of the world’s oldest botanical gardens.

In the hip Diladdarno arts district, this long-established gallery has impressive rotating shows that include Patti Smith and David LaChapelle.

Donated to the state by Count Alessandro Contini Bonacossi in 1969, this 144-piece collection contains seminal paintings, sculptures, and ceramics from the medieval and Renaissance periods. Scandalously, since 1998 it has been housed in a (usually) closed section of the Uffizi.

The inattentive observer might dismiss this minimalist white apparel store near the Duomo as just another fashion boutique. Fashion folk know that this is among the best places in Tuscany to pick up little-known labels for men and women from upcoming designers in Italy and beyond.

Established in 1999, this minimalist Japanese-Italian bar at the Ferragamo’s Gallery Hotel Art is still the meeting point for Florence’s style-conscious crowd.

The museum includes the famed monks' cells with frescoes by Fra Angelico.