Florence

Florence Travel Guide

Inspiration comes easily in Florence. A stroll along a cobbled street yields tiny cafes serving delectable pastries. Architecture and artwork that have withstood the test of time are practically around every corner.

If only one stop were on your itinerary it would have to be Galleria delgi Uffizi, one of the top things to do in Florence, but also in all of Italy. As one of the world's leading art museums, the Uffizi displays paintings and sculptures by Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, Michelangelo, and more.

The city is filled with cathedrals, but the true icon is Il Duomo, which is still regarded by modern architects as a masterpiece. You can climb 463 steps to the top and take in the view, which will likely stay with you for years to come.

Shopaholics are also well served here: Stroll chic Via de'Tornabuoni for big homegrown brands such as Prada, Louis Vuitton, Emilio Pucci, Ferragamo, and more; join in the fray at the San Lorenzo street market; or check out antiques along Via Maggio. Note that most shops are closed on Sundays.

Recent renovations at this sprawling Renaissance-Mannerist palazzo have opened up archives, grottoes, and sights that had been closed years.

The chapel contains The Expulsion of Adam and Eve, Masaccio's early Renaissance masterpiece.

This lively, sprawling street market is an obligatory stop for anyone in search of cheap and cheerful fashion accessories and gifts.

Located in the city's Diladdarno art district, the photography and video gallery, showcases cutting-edge talent such as Israeli street-art photographer David Kassman and Italy's Massimo Listri.

With his obsessive dedication and talent, Salvatore Ferragamo (1898¬–1960) was the Mozart of handmade shoes.

Along with Loretta Caponi, this antique pharmacy—in a frescoed side-chapel of the Santa Maria Novella church—is one of the most gorgeous shops in

The walls of this evocatively dim and echoing Franciscan church are lined by the tombs of some of Tuscany's greatest luminaries: artist Michelangelo, scientist Galileo, composer Rossini, political philosopher Machiavelli, sculptor Ghiberti, and many others.

View the church's frescoes by Perugino, Andrea del Sarto, and Jacopo da Pantormo.

American Carole Biagiotti represents the likes of Italian street painter Ericailcane—known for his whimsical fauna-themed paintings and drawings.

Reserve a tour of a privately owned palazzo through well-connected cultural association Città Nascosta, and you may get to meet the owner and try out the family wines.

A fantastic art-supply store that carries thick drawing paper, paintbrushes, and oils.

There’s always a long line outside Florence’s Academy of Fine Arts, everyone waiting to see arguably the world’s most famous sculpture: Michelangelo’s David (1501–04).

The Uffizi contains the world's most magnificent collection of Renaissance art from the greatest of Old Masters. This relatively small gallery, occupying the sumptuously decorated halls of the ruling Medici dynasty's one-time office complex, can easily take up a full day.

The musuem has held Medici collections of Etruscan, Roman, Greek, and Egyptian art since 1870.

Originally a medicinal garden designed for the Medici in 1545, the Botanical Gardens of Florence, also called the Giardino dei Semplici (Garden of Simple), is one of the world’s oldest botanical gardens.