Restaurants in Florence

For a unique Florentine experience, book a table on Alle Murate's mezzanine beneath the earliest known frescoed portraits of writers Dante and Boccaccio.

With white tile walls, cured hams strung from the ceiling, and marble-topped wooden tables shared with other diners, Alla Vecchia Bettola is a classic Florentine osteria. The restaurant opened in 1979 as a way to preserve regional traditions that the owners saw slipping away.

One of Florence’s first wine bars, Pane e Vino (Bread and Wine) is just a 10-minute walk from the Ponte Vecchio (Old Bridge).

The restaurant is part of the Marchesi Antinori winery, which is located in Palazzo Antinori, the Renaissance palace that has been the winery's home since the 1500's. The real gem of the compound is Buca Lapi, an unpretentious restaurant with a vague conn

If you really want to blend with the natives, head to this cart resembling a hot dog kiosk in a tiny piazza just south of the Duomo. Locals swear L’Antico Trippaio makes the best panino con lampredotto (boiled tripe sandwiches) in town.

Fashion designer Roberto Cavalli, one of Florence's most famous sons (in modern times, at least) took it upon himself to revive one of the city's institutions to its former glory.

Ask for a table on the candlelit terrace overlooking the Arno at the chic, Ferragamo-owned spot. Chef Beatrice Segoni serves fresh fish and prawn soup and millefoglie with layers of light pastry and coffee cream.

In a humble kitchen outfitted with a century-old wood burning stove, Gianlfranco Paoli served traditional Tuscan dishes such a ribollita and rabbit in balsamic vinegar to the likes of England’s Prince Charles, Oscar-winners Roberto Begnini, Anthony Hopkins, and John Malkovich.

A café with delicious small plates, located on the ground floor of a palazzo in Santa Croce.

Imagine yourself sitting on the terrace of the 14th-century Palazzo Capponi delle Rovinate, watching the sleepy crawl of the Arno as you savor a plate of hand-cut french fries and a big, juicy gourmet burger cooked to a pitch-perfect medium rare.

Owned by eccentric restaurateur Fabio Picchi of Cibreino, Teatro del Sale is a members-only restaurant/theater/social club.

Just a little off the beaten path on Borgo Ognissanti near the Communal Theater, the family-run Trattoria Armando offers cucina casaligna (homemade food) in a narrow dining room decorated with autographed photos of the opera stars who've eaten there.

At this Florentine institution near Santa Croce, sit in the rose-colored, gilt-laden dining room and sample Tuscan staples like chickpea soup with pasta, or wilder options, like salt-encased smoked goose liver and prune bread. The wine cellar contains more than 100,000 bottles.

Lauded for its simple, no-frills Tuscan fare, Sostanza is also known as Il Troia (the trough) because its long, wooden communal tables are always packed with diners enjoying the same signature dishes.

With his mass of snowy white hair and beard, it’s hard to miss restaurateur Fabio Picchi as he flits between the four establishments that make up his gourmet empire in Florence’s up-and-coming Sant’Ambrogio area.