Fitzrovia Travel Guide

London socialite and gallerist Pilar Corrias—who helped start Haunch of Venison gallery, a branch of which recently opened in New York City—opened her namesake 3,800-square-foot space to coincide with Frieze Art Fair just over a year ago.

Though there are now branches of this paper mecca across the world, the triple-decker Fitzrovia spot was the original Paperchase store, catering to artists in the area since the 1970’s. On the first floor, check out a vast range of cards, Pop-arty boxes, and one-of-a-kind printed gift wrap.

Named after a defunct British department store where owner Mark Holdstock’s mother once sold gloves, this closet-size basement bar is part 1920’s speakeasy and part English tearoom—floral wallpaper and killer retro cocktails (try the gin fizz or one from the innovative drinks list served Prohibit

The premier London vendor for art supplies, Alec Tiranti was founded by Giovanni Tiranti in 1895.

Dating back to 1883, the Fitzroy Tavern is certainly steeped in history. This London pub was a gathering place for such literary icons as Dylan Thomas and George Orwell.

Gallerist Alison Jacques worked as a curator for the British School at Rome before opening her first London space in a Mayfair town house in 2004, but three years later decamped to a roomier 3,600-square-foot space in Fitzrovia.

Theatre aficionados flock to this Fitzrovia bookshop, which is known for carrying an unmatched inventory of theatre and performance-focused literature, including titles on acting, criticism, audition material, theatre history, and print editions of some of the world’s most popular, as well

This low-lit, wood-paneled basement bar—designed by Japanese firm Super Potato—looks like a feudal Japanese ryokan reimagined by Star Trek set designers. It specializes in the Asian spirit shochu: try it mixed with plum-infused vodka in a Plum Plum.

This brand-new five-floor spread opened last May in a Georgian town house that was once a brothel. The notorious, headline-grabbing gallery is run by Steve Lazarides, the onetime art director of London’s now-defunct SleazeNation magazine.

Celebrating its 200th anniversary in 2010,  the stately Heal’s interiors store is a British institution. Climb the stairs and check out the so-called Heal’s cat, a sinewy 1925 sculpture by Chassagne peering from the mezzanine.

Originally in the vibrant East London arts district, Stuart Shave relocated his avant-garde gallery to a large, glass-fronted West End building in 2008. And, thanks to Shave’s commitment to showcasing the art of the future, his patrons followed.

Named after the Grey Shire horses, the Yorkshire Grey has been open since 1676. This stylish pub welcomes the after work crowd with a selection of beers, wines, and whiskies, as well as a seasonal pub menu.