England

England Travel Guide

Many of England's museums—common destinations for tourists—do not require an entry fee unless you plan on viewing certain exhibits. If you prefer a more unique and slightly eerie travel experience, Madame Tussauds is absolutely worth a visit. This world-renowned wax museum lets you get up close with near perfect renditions of celebrities and political figures of the past and modern-day.
Taking a break from the typical historic tour, London also has a thriving nightlife and bar scene. Tourist areas like Covent Garden and Leicester have great places to go, but West End, famous for its theatre, also features pubs like the Sanderson Hotel. Nightjar is also a hidden gem of London nightlife, located a short distance from Old Street Station.

Moving away from the center, Brighton is another popular England travel destination along the coast of the English Channel. The Brighton Festival takes place each May and is the one of the largest arts festival in the U.K., second only to the one in Edinburgh. This festival also features the Artists’ Open House in which local artists open their homes to the general public for viewing and buying their wares. Brighton has several festivals throughout the year, many dedicated to the arts, but some to alternative lifestyles.

Nottingham, affectionately known as the Queen of the Midlands, is mostly known for the legend of Robin Hood. It’s an older city to the northwest of London and also has excellent public transport. One of its most popular features is the City of Caves. This amazing complex of over five hundred caves has a history dating back to the Dark Ages and makes Nottingham the city with more man-made caves than any other lace in England.

Located in downtown Northampton, this Japanese-style spa has been welcome guests to its hotsoaking tubs, sauna, and treatment rooms since 1981.

Housed in a hulking converted power station, this vast modern art showplace opened in 2000, but still breaks new ground with installations. Each year Tate Modern hosts the unique Unilever Series, where different artists are asked to create an installation for Turbine Hall.

Consisting of two sites in Clerkenwell, the Museum of the Order of St. John tells the centuries-old story of the order, first established in Jerusalem during the Crusades. The history lesson begins at St John's Gate, which was built in 1504 as an entrance to the Priory of the Knights of St.

London socialite and gallerist Pilar Corrias—who helped start Haunch of Venison gallery, a branch of which recently opened in New York City—opened her namesake 3,800-square-foot space to coincide with Frieze Art Fair just over a year ago.

This independent traveling act is the creation of Nell Gifford, who ran away to the big top on her gap year from Oxford, and her husband, Toti.

Fine Neoclassical country house with gardens and grounds designed by Capability Brown. The behind-stairs tour is worth taking, and so is the long walk around the island sanctuary for herons.

Located in London’s Marylebone area, this Emma Bridgewater shop sells her hand-painted Yorkshire pottery. Run by Emma and husband Matthew Rice, the British company makes all of its ceramics in a 19th-century factory on the Caldon canal.