England

Restaurants in England

Located on the seventh floor of London’s famed Tate Modern gallery, the Tate Modern Restaurant features a menu of dishes created from seasonal ingredients.

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Although the decor is nothing to write home about, the extensive selection of dim sum, accompanied by never-ending pots of jasmine tea, keeps the dining area bustling at the Jade Garden in Chinatown's Soho neighborhood two blocks from Piccadilly Circus.

Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver’s phenomenally popular restaurant forged a new, anti-Michelin style of cooking because of its simplicity. Dedicated to fresh, local produce, Oliver lets the flavors and textures speak for themselves, and the results are tasty without being intimidating.

A French twist on English ingredients, such as braised veal with Herefordshire snails and duck confit.

Located in London’s Covent Garden Hotel, Brasserie Max is somewhat of a celebrity haunt, and with good reason.

Set on the bank of the Thames, this renowned French restaurant is the only establishment in the United Kingdom to hold three Michelin stars for more than 25 years. Originally opened in 1972 by Michel and Albert Roux, the Waterside Inn is now operated by Michel’s son Alain.

Overlooking Henley’s market square, this seafood restaurant is part of an ever-growing chain, with more than 40 locations throughout the United Kingdom.

The Providores and Tapa Room are separate venues united by chef/owner Peter Gordon, a New Zealander pioneer of fusion cuisine. The more casual Tapa Room's name comes not from Spain but rather the Pacific Islands, specifically the Rarotongan Tapa cloth that covers one wall.

Haggis—the Scottish dish made of sheep innards and traditionally sealed up sausage-style in the stomach—challenges many palates even in its traditional form. But Morelli’s, a shop in Harrods’s famed food hall, pushes that sheep-tissue envelope further by rendering it into ice cream.

A 17th-century pub that serves excellent beer and steak and ale pie.