Restaurants in England

From the creators of the famed London gastropub Anchor & Hope comes this eatery in Covent Garden. The no-frills interior includes red-hued walls and plain wooden tables amid dim lighting, but seating is also available at the bar.

This workaday hole-in-the-wall serves an excellent hot sausage with English mustard.

A sophisticated mainstay in Borough Market, this second-story dining room is a study in casual elegance complete with lofty ceilings, lovely white linens, and wall-to-wall windows offering impressive views of the market and St. Paul’s.

Just outside St. James Gardens, El Burrito serves crowd-pleasing burritos, tacos, quesadillas, and nachos to be washed down with fresh jugos or ice-cold Pacifico beer.

Vegetarians need not read further. Housed in a whitewashed old smokehouse near Smithfield meat market, St. John couldn’t be called a gastropub. But owner Fergus Henderson, who opened this establishment in 1994, is a canonized figure on the revitalized British restaurant scene.

Situated directly on the river Thames, this traditional pub is housed in a historic building, parts of which date back to the 14th century. A small dock sits out front, along with a seasonal outdoor terrace that provides glimpses of the river between wooden floorboards.

The Chef: Heston Blumenthal’s three-Michelin-starred restaurant, Fat Duck, in Bray, Berkshire, is a perennial favorite on acclaimed “best restaurant” lists and is famous for unusual dishes like bacon-and-eggs ice cream.

Hidden behind the soaring walls of an old Victorian school playground in residential Shoreditch lies a small converted bike shed housing Rochelle Canteen, a cafe made all the more magical by its secretive location and almost imperceptible buzzer entrance.

A neon sign reading “Guiness and Oysters” hangs over the door at this lively pub-meets elegant restaurant, informing newcomers that despite its name, the Cow is all about fresh seafood and expertly-poured pints.

Situated at the center of the upscale residential village of Marylebone, Le Relais de Venise L'Entrecôte Porte Maillot flawlessly recreates the experience of the Parisian original, which has been serving steak frites in the Seventeenth Arrondissement since 1959.

Glass walls overlook Canada Square Park and Canary Wharf’s towering skyscrapers at this modern French restaurant located on the fourth floor of Canada Place. A private lift opens onto the two-part restaurant, which contains a main dining room and a more casual bar and grill.

First designed as a luxury car showroom for the Wolseley Motors Company, this cavernous Art Deco building now houses an all-day brasserie frequented by both tourists and local celebrities.

Located in the heart of the City, L’Anima is one of area’s most popular Italian restaurants for bankers and businesses suits.

A short stroll from Soho, Chinatown is home to this cozy Chairman Mao–themed noodle and dumpling house. Szechuan cuisine is served up hot and spicy in dishes like the chili-oil-slick spicy beef noodle soup and dan-dan noodles with preserved vegetables.