Restaurants in England

Patrons willing to search for this unmarked eatery, tucked away in a converted East London factory, will likely find it's well worth the extra effort.

Run by the same owners as Chutney Mary and Verraswamy, the United Kingdom's oldest Indian restaurant, Amaya, has earned one Michelin star for its grilled kebabs and Indian-style tapas.

Run by the same company that owns the Beech House and Red Lion Inn, this oh-so-British country pub blends authentic Brit pub fare and ale with a matching atmosphere; it was named “Michelin Pub of the Year in 2008”, and the restaurant has maintained one Michelin star since 2002.

Owned by chic department store Harvey Nichols, this complex sports an unrivaled riverfront location eight stories up. Its south-facing cocktail bar and glass-walled, non-French brasserie on one side (plus an expensive restaurant on the other) offer striking vistas of St.

A posh neighborhood eatery in Primrose Hill, Odette’s is owned by celebrated chef Bryn Williams, who brings a serious pedigree and loads of culinary ambition to the Modern British menu.

Founded in 1954 as part of the second great London coffee revolution, the rickety restaurant, bar, and coffee house became a center of West London counter culture during the 50’s and 60’s, hosting everyone from Bob Dylan to Jimi Hendrix.

Despite its Mayfair location and relative youth (opened in 2004), Bellamy resembles an old-world Parisian brasserie with hardwood floors, white tablecloths, black leather banquettes, and an adjacent oyster bar.

Open for more than a century, this authentic mash and pie shop was established in 1900 to serve traveling shepherds. Today, the family-run eatery remains largely unchanged, still situated in Hackney on the border of Broadway Market.

Located in the heart of the Kings Cross area, Acorn House is a "green" restaurant from executive head chef Arthur Potts Dawson.

“Bloody brilliant!” proclaimed Londoners when Terroirs opened near the Strand.

Beef is the order of the day at this historic venue, opposite the working Smithfield cattle market (the only one in London proper). The former 19th-century meatpacking warehouse was derelict for 40 years before it reopened in 2000 as three stories (plus a roof terrace) of gastronomic excess.