Restaurants in England

Deliberately downscale amid the tony spots of Mayfair, this bistro-diner will be eerily familiar to New Yorkers, since its design and menu make it a near-clone of Keith McNally’s boho hangout, Schiller’s Liquor Bar.

The six-restaurant chain's original Belgravia location offers up Noura's modern Lebanese cuisine in a contemporary environment. Dark wood furniture is complimented by shades of tan and white.

Located on the north side of the Thames, this restaurant is one of three components that comprise the larger Wapping Project.

Both a restaurant, grocery, and butcher shop, The Natural Kitchen is the place in Marylebone for organic, free-range, and locally sourced goods.

In the middle of Greenwich's busy Royal Hill area, The Union blends traditional pub trappings with a foward-thinking approach to food and brews. Inside, cream yellow walls surround the light-stained bar, and in the back, a small collection of tables sit in a sunlit conservatory.

Benito’s Hat brings fresh, flavorful Tex-Mex cuisine to London. The owner, Ben Fordham, along with Mexican-born head chef Felipe, have created a menu of authentic dishes using local and Mexican ingredients. The menu is simple and allows guests to personalize their dishes.

The longest champagne bar on the European continent, located inside the St. Pancras International railway station, features a superb selection of champagnes, including the United Kingdom's most extensive lineup from Grand Marque houses.

As artful and intriguing as the masterpieces displayed in the gallery's nearby exhibits, the plates presented in the Whitechapel Gallery Dining Room reflect the imagination of consultant chef Angela Hartnett.

Alluring aromas drift out over Westbourne Grove from this tidy delicatessen, owned by Notting Hill restauranteur extraordinaire Tom Conran.

Authentic Chinese gourmet served in an opulent, often celeb-studded setting makes China Tang a popular spot for special occasions.

The London-based chain of pan-Asian noodle specialists got creative for its first airport restaurant. A breakfast menu includes everything from coconut porridge to yakisoba (fried soba) noodles with bacon and eggs; after noon, go for multitudinous incarnations of ramen, soba, and udon.

In the heart of Covent Garden, waiters dressed as monks scurry around the cavernous basement dining hall of Belgo Centraal serving pots of mussels, platters of spicy sausages with mashed potatoes, and halved spit-roasted chickens, accompanied by Belgian beers.

To indulge in some of the world’s finest chocolate, Londoners can either catch a flight to St. Lucia or simply head to Borough Market, home of the Rabot Estate chocolate shop and café.