England

Hotels in England

South Beach meets the East Village at London’s cutting-edge K West Hotel & Spa. Noel Pierce, of Pierce Design International, fashioned 220 calm rooms, blending soft taupes, creams, and browns with stainless steel and sandblasted glass.

Built in Victorian times as a banking hall, the Threadneedles Hotel fits in with Financial District neighbors such as the Bank of England's headquarters. A hand-painted glass dome, which dates to 1856, arcs over the lobby of walnut wall panels and marble floors.

The glass-and-steel Malmaison is a flashy addition to the banks of the Mersey. A shiny industrial metal stairway spirals upward at the front desk to the champagne bar; architectural photographs of the city help set the urbane mood.

When the Savoy opened in the heart of the theater district in 1889, it introduced many hotel firsts: the use of electricity, en-suite bathrooms, and elevators.

The counterpart to Sanctum Soho in London, the land where this nine-room, red-brick hotel sits, is owned by a rock-and-roll promoter; appropriate since the wealthy Berkshire area tends to attract musicians looking for a home near highways and Heathrow.

Overlooking Lake Windermere and the hills, this cozy 19th-century hunting lodge is full of traditional English touches: oak paneling, wing chairs, a croquet lawn, and two black Labradors.

The James Bond catchphrase “shaken, not stirred” is traced back to the DUKES Bar at this Mayfair neighborhood boutique hotel. Guestrooms in this 90-room location range from the Standard DUKES Room to the Duke of Clarence Penthouse suite, which has 24-hour butler service.

Hazlitt’s, named after the essayist William Hazlitt, is housed inside a group of historic Georgian buildings dating back to 1718.