England

Hotels in England

This 19th-century stone cottage on the water's edge in scenic Cumbria has slate-and-oak interiors, with a single cozy bedroom, a lounge with a leather sofa, and a kitchen for preparing tea and biscuits. In the slip below, a boat awaits for rowing on the private lake.

Established by Sir John Smith as a building preservation charity, this organization restores and rents more than 190 landmark residences in Britain, France, and Italy. The buildings accommodate 1—16 guests, and are available for stays of up to three weeks.

This stately red-brick Victorian hotel with plush, antiques-filled interiors, opposite Kensington Palace has 57 rooms, 6 apartments, 1 restaurant, and 1 bar, all perfectly refined and with the best service around.

With a prime address on Park Lane facing Hyde Park, this grande dame embodies a posh formality that’s attracted Prince Philip (who held his bachelor party here in 1949) as well as rock and Hollywood royalty who regularly take up residence.

One block from the Paddington tube station, this 64-room Indigo property (the first outside North America) overlooks the manicured landscape of Norfolk Square Gardens.

The 19th-century farmstead features vaulted ceilings and large stone fireplaces.

This hotel was a trailblazer of the budget-boutique trend that emerged in the late 1990’s, and it’s still one of the best, offering stylish, comfortable accommodations with luxurious touches (but without an equivalent tariff).

Often lauded as the best hotel in the city, Dean Street Townhouse is a haven of serenity and simple elegance in London’s bustling Soho district.

In the newly hip Mayfair district, this landmark brick Victorian has reclaimed the glory of its golden era thanks to a $140 million renovation, creating a sophisticated throwback that no soulless Modernist hotel could ever hope to emulate.

On Cornwall’s rugged coast, the brightly painted hotel is situated along the ancient pilgrims’ route to Land’s End. Rooms are rustic in feel: wool blankets draped over beds, old books on the nightstands, and bathrooms stocked with locally made soaps.