England

Hotels in England

The glass-and-steel Malmaison is a flashy addition to the banks of the Mersey. A shiny industrial metal stairway spirals upward at the front desk to the champagne bar; architectural photographs of the city help set the urbane mood.

When the Savoy opened in the heart of the theater district in 1889, it introduced many hotel firsts: the use of electricity, en-suite bathrooms, and elevators.

The counterpart to Sanctum Soho in London, the land where this nine-room, red-brick hotel sits, is owned by a rock-and-roll promoter; appropriate since the wealthy Berkshire area tends to attract musicians looking for a home near highways and Heathrow.

Overlooking Lake Windermere and the hills, this cozy 19th-century hunting lodge is full of traditional English touches: oak paneling, wing chairs, a croquet lawn, and two black Labradors.

The James Bond catchphrase “shaken, not stirred” is traced back to the DUKES Bar at this Mayfair neighborhood boutique hotel. Guestrooms in this 90-room location range from the Standard DUKES Room to the Duke of Clarence Penthouse suite, which has 24-hour butler service.

Hazlitt’s, named after the essayist William Hazlitt, is housed inside a group of historic Georgian buildings dating back to 1718.

Housed on a dramatic 55 acres, the hotel may look to be out of a Knoll showroom, and the spa may be frequented by boldface names, but there are rows of wellies for visitors who have chosen not to haul their own.

With history dating back to 3,000 B.C. (pottery found on the grounds), this hotel has played many roles: residence, boarding school, secret military headquarters, and gardening school are just a few.