England

Hotels in England

Depending on your desired city of exploration, there are several places that provide a place to sleep that has the feel of a home away from home. If you would prefer to be along the coast, the Boscastle Youth Hostel in Cornwall is a down-to-earth, relaxed place to stay that also won’t cost a fortune. Many other hotels in England and cottages have the same idea of affordability and tranquility, such as the Lengthsmans Cottage (outside of Birmingham) and the Dannah Farm Hotel (Derbyshire). England hotels may not be cheap, but offer outstanding service. This guide will help you to find the best hotels in England.

Pride of Britian is a chain of luxury hotels. These hotels are family run and offer personal service. They are some of the finest hotels in England. These hotels are well known around the world. Plus, they offer fine dining and luxury spas.

Two 18th-century row houses—set on an immaculate lawn made for picnics—at the center of Bath’s Royal Crescent, a series of Georgian-era residences.

Sourcing most of its food from right on the property, the Pig functions as a less hands-on agriturismo—a fantasia of the Dirty Life for would-be back-to-the-landers.

Since the opening of this great value hotel in 2002, chef-owner Simon Rogan’s inventive cooking has quietly grown in acclaim, culminating in a Michelin star for the restaurant in 2005.

Singaporean hotelier Peng Loh made his European debut by transforming an Edwardian town hall into a fine-dining restaurant, 98 rooms and apartments, and public spaces that exhibit work by up-and-coming East End artists.

South Beach meets the East Village at London’s cutting-edge K West Hotel & Spa. Noel Pierce, of Pierce Design International, fashioned 220 calm rooms, blending soft taupes, creams, and browns with stainless steel and sandblasted glass.

Built in Victorian times as a banking hall, the Threadneedles Hotel fits in with Financial District neighbors such as the Bank of England's headquarters. A hand-painted glass dome, which dates to 1856, arcs over the lobby of walnut wall panels and marble floors.

Opened in 1899, this Gothic Revival masterpiece was to be London’s gateway to the Continent via a railway link to the impending Channel tunnel. Alas, financiers overshot tunnel construction by a century, rail travel declined, and the hotel fell into disrepair.

Housed on a dramatic 55 acres, the hotel may look to be out of a Knoll showroom, and the spa may be frequented by boldface names, but there are rows of wellies for visitors who have chosen not to haul their own.

With history dating back to 3,000 B.C. (pottery found on the grounds), this hotel has played many roles: residence, boarding school, secret military headquarters, and gardening school are just a few.

Opened in March 2011, the hotel is house in part of the landmark train station, with a restaurant designed by David Collins and helmed by Marcus Wareing of the Berkeley Hotel.

Formerly the Westcote Inn