England

Things to do in England

Many of England's museums—common destinations for tourists—do not require an entry fee unless you plan on viewing certain exhibits. If you prefer a more unique and slightly eerie travel experience, Madame Tussauds is absolutely worth a visit. This world-renowned wax museum lets you get up close with near perfect renditions of celebrities and political figures of the past and modern-day.
Taking a break from the typical historic tour, London also has a thriving nightlife and bar scene. Tourist areas like Covent Garden and Leicester have great places to go, but West End, famous for its theatre, also features pubs like the Sanderson Hotel. Nightjar is also a hidden gem of London nightlife, located a short distance from Old Street Station.

Moving away from the center, Brighton is another popular England travel destination along the coast of the English Channel. The Brighton Festival takes place each May and is the one of the largest arts festival in the U.K., second only to the one in Edinburgh. This festival also features the Artists’ Open House in which local artists open their homes to the general public for viewing and buying their wares. Brighton has several festivals throughout the year, many dedicated to the arts, but some to alternative lifestyles.

Nottingham, affectionately known as the Queen of the Midlands, is mostly known for the legend of Robin Hood. It’s an older city to the northwest of London and also has excellent public transport. One of its most popular features is the City of Caves. This amazing complex of over five hundred caves has a history dating back to the Dark Ages and makes Nottingham the city with more man-made caves than any other lace in England.

This London shop has been stocking London’s most elegant kitchens with house-brand tableware for 40 years.

Located on the first floor of the stylish Mint Hotel in London’s Westminster neighborhood, the Millbank Lounge is known for having the best handcrafted cocktails around. A bright red carpet and sleek red and brown sofas add a pop of color within the crème walls.

Founded in 1945, Housmans was one of London’s first progressive bookstores. Today, it has become one of the few such stores remaining in the United Kingdom.

Learn about the area’s rich prehistoric legacy through guided visits to nearby sites, such as a network of 13,000-year-old cave paintings discovered in 2002.

Situated in the Stratford neighborhood, this restored Victorian theater produces an average of seven shows each year, as well as a pantomime and one-time events.

Founded by Sue Cruttenden in 1979, the Sunbury Antiques Market is England’s longest running bi-monthly market. With 700 stalls (350 inside and 350 outside), it’s also the country’s largest.

Founded in 1673 by the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London, the Chelsea Physic Garden is the city’s oldest botanic garden and home to Britain's first garden of ethnobotany.

At Isis Ceramics, outside Oxford, owner Deborah Sears, a collector of 17th-century English delftware, has resuscitated the art of hand-painted tin-glaze patterns.

Brace Yourself: Sure, Britain’s mostly dreary climate can seem like a strange choice for a theme park, but this roller coaster, built in 2002, still holds the record for number of inversions: 10.

Designer Emma Hope’s Sloane Square store sells vintage-inspired shoes and handbags to London’s fashionable set. After starting her career at Laura Ashley, Hope established her own line of footwear which is at once trend-conscious and sensible.

Every four to five weeks, an enthusiastic crowd of designers, celebrities, boutique owners and dedicated fashionistas flock to Hammersmith Town Hall to browse the best in vintage fashion at this legendary one-day fair.

This tea emporium in Covent Garden Piazza carries more than 120 teas and herbal infusions from around the world. Teas come in an array of black, green, white, Oolong, Jasmine, and Rooibos types: blended, single-estate, and/or flavored.

Opened in 2003, this gorgeous contemporary gallery is the London branch of a renowned German chain run by art dealers extraordinaire Monika Sprüth and Philomene Magers.

Housed in restored Victorian potting sheds, this artisanal food shop is located at the southern edge of the Home Park, part of the Windsor Castle estate.