England

Things to do in England

Many of England's museums—common destinations for tourists—do not require an entry fee unless you plan on viewing certain exhibits. If you prefer a more unique and slightly eerie travel experience, Madame Tussauds is absolutely worth a visit. This world-renowned wax museum lets you get up close with near perfect renditions of celebrities and political figures of the past and modern-day.
Taking a break from the typical historic tour, London also has a thriving nightlife and bar scene. Tourist areas like Covent Garden and Leicester have great places to go, but West End, famous for its theatre, also features pubs like the Sanderson Hotel. Nightjar is also a hidden gem of London nightlife, located a short distance from Old Street Station.

Moving away from the center, Brighton is another popular England travel destination along the coast of the English Channel. The Brighton Festival takes place each May and is the one of the largest arts festival in the U.K., second only to the one in Edinburgh. This festival also features the Artists’ Open House in which local artists open their homes to the general public for viewing and buying their wares. Brighton has several festivals throughout the year, many dedicated to the arts, but some to alternative lifestyles.

Nottingham, affectionately known as the Queen of the Midlands, is mostly known for the legend of Robin Hood. It’s an older city to the northwest of London and also has excellent public transport. One of its most popular features is the City of Caves. This amazing complex of over five hundred caves has a history dating back to the Dark Ages and makes Nottingham the city with more man-made caves than any other lace in England.

Since 1988, Portobello Print & Map Shop has been trading with collectors and dealers in the Portobello Antique Market.

British Airways commissioned site-specific, technologically enhanced pieces from Oona Culley, Troika, and other contemporary British artists for its new T5 Galleries lounges, open only to British Airways passengers.

This transport company has 3,000 mini-cabs to cover London and its surrounding areas. Six-seaters, four-seaters, and VIP-service Mercedes E-Class and S-Class sedans are operated by well dressed, background-checked drivers.

Named after the Grey Shire horses, the Yorkshire Grey has been open since 1676. This stylish pub welcomes the after work crowd with a selection of beers, wines, and whiskies, as well as a seasonal pub menu.

Located inside East London’s Old Truman Brewery, Junky Styling is the brainchild of self-taught designers Annika Sanders and Kerry Seager.  Founded in 1997, the innovative label takes high-quality secondhand clothing and reworks it into fashionable new garments.

Converted-warehouse branch of the London museum.

A walk along the river’s South Bank from Westminster Bridge to Tower Bridge is a pleasant mile-and-a-half stroll that can include stops at the London Eye, Tate Modern, and the 250-year-old, four-acre Borough food market (Friday and Saturday under the railway arches opposite Southward Cathedral).

Since 1906, Anderson & Sheppard has been an icon in bespoke tailoring. Located on London’s Savile Row, the well-known shop is reminiscent of a gentlemen’s study with leather sofas, a dark wood bookshelf and fireplace.

This prestigious clothing store is located on London’s famous Savile Row and is renowned for selling the finest quality menswear.

Drawing from the discerning taste of its owners—former British Vogue writer Ian Holmes and restaurateur/gallery owner Meryanne Loum-Martin—this London-based company selects sites for their privacy, style, and individuality.

Daring fashionistas from across the globe are sporting bold urban threads from Public Beware, a stylish East End boutique located in the Old Truman Brewery.

The city’s most storied wine bar has been operating as such since 1890, and today you can relish a glass of one of 80 wines (a blackboard shows daily specials) within the subterranean medieval vaults that literally drip with ambience.

In 1679, a man attacked John Dryden in this tiny pub’s alleyway for writing scurrilous verses about one of Charles II’s mistresses. These days, drinkers spill out into the alley during summertime; during winter, they cozy up around the working fireplaces and leaded-glass windows.

A severe gray building on the south bank of the Thames, the Hayward Gallery hides within its austere walls a stimulating smorgasbord of modern and contemporary art displayed in ever-changing exhibits.