Edinburgh

Edinburgh Travel Guide

The glass cases in this boutique are stocked with notable estate pieces like vintage square-cut emerald necklaces and antique gentlemen's pocketknives; the shimmering tourmalines, black opals, and mother-of-pearl items range from astronomical to within reach.

Every summer, en route to Balmoral from Buckingham Palace, Queen Elizabeth II stops at this spectacular, if lesser-known, 16th-century royal residence to host an annual Garden Party.

This Edinburgh neighborhood is dominated by Georgian architecture and lined with cafés and boutiques.

Edinburgh's most glamorous set congregates at the city's buzziest club under the Tigerlily Hotel. The black-and-rose wallpaper is embedded with Swarovski crystals, and top mixologists shake, muddle, and stir while DJ's spin a mix of Latin and techno.

Established in 1842, this bottler deals in fine aged single-cask whiskey from distilleries like Banff, Glenlivet Minmore, and Royal Brackla; the naturally caramel-colored, concentrated liquors are of a rare quality.

Top fashion houses commission Rohde's cashmere handiwork. The designer, who only works with the finest yarns from Scotland in her town-house atelier sells discounted elbow-length gloves and sweaters in candy colors. Call ahead for an appointment.

The hottest contemporary-arts gallery in the city once housed a 1938 produce market; now displayed are the works of Scottish artists like Christine Borland and emerging international talents. The chic industrial café is great for people-watching.

A 10-day celebration of film, theater, and food that takes place along the Edinburgh harbor.

In a funky chandeliered lounge known for the Adidas sneaker collection displayed above the bar, sip an Ape Expectations (local Monkey Shoulder Whiskey, maple syrup, and fresh mandarin orange juice).

Catalonian architect Enric Miralles went $767 million over budget on his 2004 architectural masterpiece, which won the U.K.'s most prestigious architectural award, the Stirling Prize, in 2005.

Behind a narrow red storefront on Victoria Street, this self-proclaimed “liquid deli” is a cross between a liquor store and an old-fashioned apothecary shop. Inside, the open wooden shelves are lined with row after row of Italian glass demijohns in a variety of shapes and sizes.

Salty locals haunt this no-frills establishment with long literary traditions; it's favored by writers and is featured in native Ian Rankin's Inspector Rebus novels.