East Village

Restaurants in East Village

You’ll sometimes spot a boldface name, sans entourage, sipping cappuccino and tucking into a plate of haloumi eggs at this sunny, busy Moroccan café that has been a magnet for artists, musicians, and writers since it opened in 1983.

Chef Sara Jenkins’ tiny storefront take-away features a well-lit display case of its namesake succulent roast pork, great soups and sides (potatoes and burnt ends are a must), but only seven seats at the narrow counter.

Housed in a former foodcart garage, this mostly-Korean hot spot offers a space far more expansive than most in this low-rise neighborhood.

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.

From restaurateur Jack Lamb comes this tiny, 16-seat restaurant in the East Village. At Degustation, chef Wesley Genovart, who previously worked at Perry St, is the center of attention since all seats at the U-shaped counter face the open kitchen.

A small, East Village wine bar owned by Marco Canora and Paul Grieco, famous for their work at neighboring Hearth Restaurant, Terroir celebrates everything wine.

The lack of space, or chairs, allows you to focus on the perfect cup of coffee at Abraco's Espresso Bar in the East Village. In the tiny but cheerful bar, famous barista and co-owner Jamie McCormick grinds and brews each cup of coffee to order.

Dedicated to creating “a new chocolate culture,” Max Brenner, who often refers to himself as "the bald man," opened this restaurant devoted solely to chocolate back in 2006.

Tarallucci e Vino famously operates under the philosophy that "generally, appetizers and desserts are the most interesting items on the menu," and to that effect they warmly welcome patrons seeking no more than a stellar glass of wine and a plate of artisanal cheeses.

Super-sized pricing and exquisite décor mark this subterranean Japanese restaurant high end for the East Village.

This spare yet cozy East Village joint, endearingly decorated with old agricultural implements and populated by bearded neo-bohemians, is the brainchild of Peter Hoffman, who was championing sustainable agriculture at Savoy long before the current farm-to-table trend swept up New York.

Mexico City—born chef Patricio Sandoval reinterprets traditional Mexican cuisine using local ingredients at this East Village taqueria.