East Village

Restaurants in East Village

You’ll sometimes spot a boldface name, sans entourage, sipping cappuccino and tucking into a plate of haloumi eggs at this sunny, busy Moroccan café that has been a magnet for artists, musicians, and writers since it opened in 1983.

Chef Sara Jenkins’ tiny storefront take-away features a well-lit display case of its namesake succulent roast pork, great soups and sides (potatoes and burnt ends are a must), but only seven seats at the narrow counter.

Housed in a former foodcart garage, this mostly-Korean hot spot offers a space far more expansive than most in this low-rise neighborhood.

Sometimes it takes an extreme focus to bring about perfection. Such is the case for Pommes Frites in the East Village. True to its name, it only sells fries, but these are fries prepared the Belgian way: fried once for cooking and then twice for a golden color and perfect crispness.

The Ukrainian couple Wolodymyr and Olha Darmochawal traveled to New York to escape war in their own country, and inspired by fellow immigrants in the East Village, they opened a candy and newsstand in 1954 that eventually became the famous Veselka.

Living up to the restaurant’s name, the servers at Hearth, located near Stuyvesant Town, are committed to providing old-fashioned, small town hospitality to their guests.

If you haven’t found your neighborhood Vietnamese sandwich shop (everyone should have one), Nicky’s is a good place to begin. If it’s your first time in one of their locations, don’t let its size (tiny) and appearance (ramshackle) put you off. What lies inside is love at first bite.

This sleek, wooden East Village noodle bar has the right kind of hype—not the high-gloss, flashy, media type, but the street level, word-of-mouth kind. The reason?

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.

From restaurateur Jack Lamb comes this tiny, 16-seat restaurant in the East Village. At Degustation, chef Wesley Genovart, who previously worked at Perry St, is the center of attention since all seats at the U-shaped counter face the open kitchen.

A small, East Village wine bar owned by Marco Canora and Paul Grieco, famous for their work at neighboring Hearth Restaurant, Terroir celebrates everything wine.