East Village

Restaurants in East Village

Chef Sara Jenkins’ tiny storefront take-away features a well-lit display case of its namesake succulent roast pork, great soups and sides (potatoes and burnt ends are a must), but only seven seats at the narrow counter.

Housed in a former foodcart garage, this mostly-Korean hot spot offers a space far more expansive than most in this low-rise neighborhood.

You’ll sometimes spot a boldface name, sans entourage, sipping cappuccino and tucking into a plate of haloumi eggs at this sunny, busy Moroccan café that has been a magnet for artists, musicians, and writers since it opened in 1983.

Positioned on the corner of Ave. A and East 9th St. in Alphabet City, this café is filled with mismatched chairs and makeshift tables arranged over worn wood floors. Random cupboards store mugs and serve as the coffee condiment bar, adding to the antique-shop appeal of the restaurant.

This sleek, wooden East Village noodle bar has the right kind of hype—not the high-gloss, flashy, media type, but the street level, word-of-mouth kind. The reason?

Mexico City—born chef Patricio Sandoval reinterprets traditional Mexican cuisine using local ingredients at this East Village taqueria.

Styled after an old farmhouse, this restaurant on East 10th Street sports a wood-framed exterior with a green awning, providing a rather subtle introduction to what regulars have identified as one of the East Village's dining standards.

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.

The original Il Buco a block away started life as an antique shop and evolved into a homey, well-loved trattoria.

Jack's Luxury Oyster Bar in the East Village gives a nod to New England with its knotty-pine bar, red and white checked walls, seascape paintings, and antique cupboard.

From restaurateur Jack Lamb comes this tiny, 16-seat restaurant in the East Village. At Degustation, chef Wesley Genovart, who previously worked at Perry St, is the center of attention since all seats at the U-shaped counter face the open kitchen.

This cafeteria-style Union Square spot is a late-night favorite for burgers and booze-spiked milkshakes.

The consistent freshness of the fish is what keeps this East Village restaurant afloat in a city full of sushi options.

A small, East Village wine bar owned by Marco Canora and Paul Grieco, famous for their work at neighboring Hearth Restaurant, Terroir celebrates everything wine.