East Village

Restaurants in East Village

You’ll sometimes spot a boldface name, sans entourage, sipping cappuccino and tucking into a plate of haloumi eggs at this sunny, busy Moroccan café that has been a magnet for artists, musicians, and writers since it opened in 1983.

Chef Sara Jenkins’ tiny storefront take-away features a well-lit display case of its namesake succulent roast pork, great soups and sides (potatoes and burnt ends are a must), but only seven seats at the narrow counter.

Housed in a former foodcart garage, this mostly-Korean hot spot offers a space far more expansive than most in this low-rise neighborhood.

Dedicated to creating “a new chocolate culture,” Max Brenner, who often refers to himself as "the bald man," opened this restaurant devoted solely to chocolate back in 2006.

With a mile-long list of accolades and awards—and even longer waits for stools at his East Village dining bars—the Korean-American cook David Chang is New York’s favorite chef du jour.

The Ukrainian couple Wolodymyr and Olha Darmochawal traveled to New York to escape war in their own country, and inspired by fellow immigrants in the East Village, they opened a candy and newsstand in 1954 that eventually became the famous Veselka.

Tarallucci e Vino famously operates under the philosophy that "generally, appetizers and desserts are the most interesting items on the menu," and to that effect they warmly welcome patrons seeking no more than a stellar glass of wine and a plate of artisanal cheeses.

Gabrielle Hamilton's gutsy food at her hole-in-the-wall café on the Lower East Side is inspired by classic American dishes. Don't miss the "Dutch Style" jumbo blueberry pancake baked in the oven—it's paired with Canadian bacon, sour cream and powdered sugar.

Living up to the restaurant’s name, the servers at Hearth, located near Stuyvesant Town, are committed to providing old-fashioned, small town hospitality to their guests.

Super-sized pricing and exquisite décor mark this subterranean Japanese restaurant high end for the East Village.

If you haven’t found your neighborhood Vietnamese sandwich shop (everyone should have one), Nicky’s is a good place to begin. If it’s your first time in one of their locations, don’t let its size (tiny) and appearance (ramshackle) put you off. What lies inside is love at first bite.

Located in the East Village, this intimate dining spot serves only one option: a prix fixe tasting menu. The two-star Michelin award winning Ko has only 12 seats along a kitchen counter. Along with his staff Chef Peter Serpico serves up innovative American cuisine and a daily rotating menu.