East Village

Restaurants in East Village

Chef Sara Jenkins’ tiny storefront take-away features a well-lit display case of its namesake succulent roast pork, great soups and sides (potatoes and burnt ends are a must), but only seven seats at the narrow counter.

Housed in a former foodcart garage, this mostly-Korean hot spot offers a space far more expansive than most in this low-rise neighborhood.

You’ll sometimes spot a boldface name, sans entourage, sipping cappuccino and tucking into a plate of haloumi eggs at this sunny, busy Moroccan café that has been a magnet for artists, musicians, and writers since it opened in 1983.

Located in the East Village, this intimate dining spot serves only one option: a prix fixe tasting menu. The two-star Michelin award winning Ko has only 12 seats along a kitchen counter. Along with his staff Chef Peter Serpico serves up innovative American cuisine and a daily rotating menu.

A Greenwich Village institution since 1984, the James Beard Award-winning Gotham Bar & Grill is an ever-evolving landmark, consistently introducing new seasonal dishes and updating the 20,000-bottle wine cellar.

This spare yet cozy East Village joint, endearingly decorated with old agricultural implements and populated by bearded neo-bohemians, is the brainchild of Peter Hoffman, who was championing sustainable agriculture at Savoy long before the current farm-to-table trend swept up New York.

Positioned on the corner of Ave. A and East 9th St. in Alphabet City, this café is filled with mismatched chairs and makeshift tables arranged over worn wood floors. Random cupboards store mugs and serve as the coffee condiment bar, adding to the antique-shop appeal of the restaurant.

This sleek, wooden East Village noodle bar has the right kind of hype—not the high-gloss, flashy, media type, but the street level, word-of-mouth kind. The reason?

Mexico City—born chef Patricio Sandoval reinterprets traditional Mexican cuisine using local ingredients at this East Village taqueria.

Styled after an old farmhouse, this restaurant on East 10th Street sports a wood-framed exterior with a green awning, providing a rather subtle introduction to what regulars have identified as one of the East Village's dining standards.

Even those not in the neighborhood don't mind the trek over to the East Village for the ultra-thin crust of Gruppo’s pies. A simple red awning with the restaurant’s name beckons those off Ave. B into the low-lit dining room with exposed brick walls and wooden tables, typical of a pizzeria.