Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik Travel Guide

This nearly 150-year-old traditional Milanese millinery shop still makes its impeccably crafted hats on the original molds.

Quite possibly the perfect beach bar, this hole-in-the-wall unfolds across a series of terraces hewn to the cliffs with nothing but a narrow railing between your table and the Adriatic. To reach it, walk through a tiny opening in the Old Town ramparts, marked by a sign that reads COLD DRINKS.

There are 17 churches in the Old Town, but if you only have time for one, make it the Baroque, domed Dubrovnik cathedral. Titian's polyptych The Assumption hangs behind the main altar.

Check out the ancient potions and jars on display inside the Romanesque monastery's pharmacy, which has been in business since 1317. You can also pick up some locally produced cosmetics from this century.

The lush courtyard inside the sprawling Gothic-Renaissance building hosts art exhibitions and the occasional concert. The state archives are also housed here, as is a memorial to the Croats who were killed in the 1991–1992 siege of Dubrovnik.

Inside the fortress-like cloister—built around the same time as the city walls—you'll find a rich collection of Renaissance paintings and hundreds of illuminated manuscripts.

This gallery and gift shop near the Dominican monastery sells Croatian art and a wide selection of wines from the nearby Peljesac peninsula.

South of Luza Square is the former castle that now houses the Museum of Dubrovnik, which has artifacts—including old coins and furnishings—from the city's illustrious past.

When the sun sets, tourists pack into the cafés around Stradun. Natives, however, head farther afield, congregating along Bana Jelacica between Old Town and Gruz. The club of choice: the ever-popular Roxy.

Dubrovnik is not the place for cutting-edge clothing and furniture boutiques, but Old Town is home to a handful of quirky stores—and a thriving gallery scene.

A massive renovation in the past several years has made the neo-Renaissance building near Banja beach the best place to gain perspective on Croatia's unique 19th-century artists; it houses more than 2,000 works by native painters and sculptors.