Dubrovnik + The Dalmatian Coast

Dubrovnik + The Dalmatian Coast Travel Guide

This massive nightclub resides near the harbor on Croatia’s Hvar Island and takes on different personalities throughout the day. When the sun’s out, people lounge by the edge of azure waters, bring out boats, and relax.

Inside the fortress-like cloister—built around the same time as the city walls—you'll find a rich collection of Renaissance paintings and hundreds of illuminated manuscripts.

Stop by this outdoor club, especially during July when it hosts an annual music festival.

Located on Croatia's Brac Island, Zlatni Rat (Golden Horn) Beach takes its moniker from the cone-shaped, white-pebble beach that measures out to about 520 meters along the southern coast of Bol, an island just off the mainland of Croatia.

Located in the 15th-century Zackerjan Tower on Old Town’s waterfront, this cocktail bar has views of the Peljesac Channel from the rooftop terrace. Prime seating is located on the upper level, which can only be accessed by carefully climbing a steep, wooden ladder in the inner chamber.

This gallery and gift shop near the Dominican monastery sells Croatian art and a wide selection of wines from the nearby Peljesac peninsula.

South of Luza Square is the former castle that now houses the Museum of Dubrovnik, which has artifacts—including old coins and furnishings—from the city's illustrious past.

U.K.-based Croatian Villas has more than 350 beautiful houses set along the water and on hilltops all over the country, from Dubrovnik to the Istrian peninsula, which many travelers call the less-touristed (and more affordable) Tuscany.

Spot this popular bar in historic Groda, the city’s oldest neighborhood that centers on Svetog Stjepana (St. Stephen) Square, thanks to the all-white laundry and lanterns hanging outside.

When the sun sets, tourists pack into the cafés around Stradun. Natives, however, head farther afield, congregating along Bana Jelacica between Old Town and Gruz. The club of choice: the ever-popular Roxy.

For romantic views and convenient island-hopping, take the ferry one way down the coast (anywhere from 7 to 11 hours between Dubrovnik and Split), but for speed (and minor savings), ride the bus back in 4.5 hours.

A must see for anyone's Croatia itinerary, this fourth-century palace is magnificent.

Quite possibly the perfect beach bar, this hole-in-the-wall unfolds across a series of terraces hewn to the cliffs with nothing but a narrow railing between your table and the Adriatic. To reach it, walk through a tiny opening in the Old Town ramparts, marked by a sign that reads COLD DRINKS.

Dubrovnik is not the place for cutting-edge clothing and furniture boutiques, but Old Town is home to a handful of quirky stores—and a thriving gallery scene.

A massive renovation in the past several years has made the neo-Renaissance building near Banja beach the best place to gain perspective on Croatia's unique 19th-century artists; it houses more than 2,000 works by native painters and sculptors.