Dublin

Dublin Travel Guide

The cheeses are displayed on long wooden tables and kept at a constant temperature of around 50 degrees.

Devitts on Camden Street is a great little pub for a chat and a couple of pints. The atmosphere is relaxed and the sound of conversation is all that fills the air. The pints are great and the service is grand. The bar is quite long and the seating area is quite spacious.

It’s brash and showy, but this archetypal Dawson Street bar is still well worth a visit.

Combining the city’s two most famous exports—writers and beer—this long-running tour takes thirsty readers on a two-hour spin through some of Dublin’s storied literary watering holes.

This temple to the city’s renowned stout—a product that’s helped sustain Ireland’s economy for centuries—is the country’s star tourist attraction. The property, originally built in 1908 to house fermentation tanks, bears little resemblance today to the original operation.

At the long and narrow Cobblestone pub, in Smithfield, in the early evening and then again after dinner, musicians take turns depositing tall pints of Guinness before each member of the band.

POD

Though Dublin’s better known for its pub culture than its nightclubs, this converted train station has been packing in crowds since the early 1990s.

This magnificent 1774 Georgian townhouse (which lingered in a semi-ruined state for years before it was transformed in 1981) is now one of Dublin’s most stylish shopping destinations.

Europe’s largest enclosed urban park—encompassing more than 1,700 acres—is set just two miles west from the city center.

One of the oldest in Dublin, The Stag's Head has stained-glass windows, a massive mahogany bar, and a snug—a small, enclosed space where women in the 18th century could drink and not be seen.

One of the oldest pubs in Dublin, the Palace Bar was once frequented by such renowned writers as James Joyce, Flann O’Brien, and R.M. Smyllie, former editor of the Irish Times.

The thumping heart of the Irish indie-music scene, Whelan’s is where you’ll find local heroes like Mundy, David Kitt, and Glen Hansard rubbing shoulders with students and earnest wannabe singer-songwriters at the cramped wood-paneled bar.

The most elegant of Dublin’s department stores stocks designer apparel from around the world. Brown Thomas has been part of the Grafton Street landscape since 1849, but shopping there today feels as au courant as a trip to Bendel’s in New York or Harvey Nichols in London.