Dublin Travel Guide

An old liquor store with a beveled-glass cashier's booth.

When Paddy and Maureen O’Donoghue opened this bar in 1934, they invited local musicians to perform each night. Considered to be the birthplace of the popular group, The Dubliners, O’Donoghue’s maintains its nightly musical tradition.

Karen Crawford’s boutique originally began life on Smock Alley in Temple Bar before moving to the heart of Dublin’s fashion hub on Drury Street.

Walking into this somber, dignified Protestant church with its magnificent organ is certainly impressive—but the star attraction here is underneath your feet. After a guide opens a creaking door, revealing a dark stone staircase, you can creep down into the crypt of St.

This Victorian gem with its ornate molding and red velvet boxes is a Dublin institution, hosting a rotating schedule of stand-up comedy, big-name rock gigs, and popular theater.

What started almost three centuries ago as a humble weaving shop (in the Wicklow village of the same name) is now a retail empire.

An oasis of tranquillity in the teeming center of Dublin, this campus of wide green lawns and stately 16th-century buildings is the city’s undisputed jewel.

The library's founder, the Archbishop Narcissus Marsh, believed that everyone should have access to books on medicine, law, science, travel, navigation, mathematics, music, classical literature, and, of course, theology.

The Cobblestone is located at the top of Smithfield, near the Four Courts, in the North Inner City. The D7 area has recently become very trendy among the late '20s and early '30s and many mingle with inner city Dubliners in this convivial old bar.

There’s nothing immediately distinctive or compelling about Peter’s…but then, unassuming comfort is essential for a good Dublin pub. What is notable here is the absence of both trinkety tourist-bait décor and flickering televisions—and the presence of real neighborhood locals.

Also known as the Dublin City Gallery, this delightful and manageable contemporary art gallery is arguably the city’s finest art space. The selection of work by 20th-century Irish artists is strong (including pieces by Sir John Lavery, Jack B.

The resting place of 14 of the executed leaders of the insurrection of 1916.