Dublin

Dublin Travel Guide

The Cobblestone is located at the top of Smithfield, near the Four Courts, in the North Inner City. The D7 area has recently become very trendy among the late '20s and early '30s and many mingle with inner city Dubliners in this convivial old bar.

There’s nothing immediately distinctive or compelling about Peter’s…but then, unassuming comfort is essential for a good Dublin pub. What is notable here is the absence of both trinkety tourist-bait décor and flickering televisions—and the presence of real neighborhood locals.

Also known as the Dublin City Gallery, this delightful and manageable contemporary art gallery is arguably the city’s finest art space. The selection of work by 20th-century Irish artists is strong (including pieces by Sir John Lavery, Jack B.

The resting place of 14 of the executed leaders of the insurrection of 1916.

Attending a true Dublin “trad session”—a group jam session featuring instruments like violin, mandolin, banjo, accordion, and uilleann pipes—is a memorable event.

The latest addition to the George’s Street scene takes a humorous angle on the current economic recession. The owners have outfitted the bar-restaurant like a tenement, with recycled furniture, a hodgepodge of tag-sale objets, and lines of hanging laundry.

The best in Irish design is showcased in this Nassau Street store, handily located between Trinity College and the National Museum on Kildare Street.

A standout collection of European masters.

Housed in a graceful building that is itself a sort of exhibit (with classically Victorian architecture and a rotunda based on Rome’s Pantheon), this archaeological museum explores Ireland’s ancient Celtic heritage.

The cheeses are displayed on long wooden tables and kept at a constant temperature of around 50 degrees.

Devitts on Camden Street is a great little pub for a chat and a couple of pints. The atmosphere is relaxed and the sound of conversation is all that fills the air. The pints are great and the service is grand. The bar is quite long and the seating area is quite spacious.

It’s brash and showy, but this archetypal Dawson Street bar is still well worth a visit.

Combining the city’s two most famous exports—writers and beer—this long-running tour takes thirsty readers on a two-hour spin through some of Dublin’s storied literary watering holes.

This temple to the city’s renowned stout—a product that’s helped sustain Ireland’s economy for centuries—is the country’s star tourist attraction. The property, originally built in 1908 to house fermentation tanks, bears little resemblance today to the original operation.