Dublin

Dublin Travel Guide

Much of the charm of Dublin is wandering through its various neighborhoods and taking time to linger over the details of a Georgian home or the goods in, say, a traditional lace store. That said, there are some must-see sights as well.
O'Connell Street. Dublin's main thoroughfare is lined with neoclassical buildings, many with shops on their grand floors. The street was also the sight of many key battles in Ireland's uprising against British rule.
National Museum. The National Museum of Ireland is actually three museums in Dublin (as well as another one in County Mayo). Visits to all three, which focus on archeology, the decorative arts, and the history museum, will give you a nuanced overview of Ireland and its people.
Temple Bar. Head to this area south of the River Liffey to visit galleries by day and the nightlife after dark.
St. Patrick's Cathedral. The largest church in Ireland dates from the 12th century. Much of Ireland's history has played out here, including some surprising footnotes: Jonathan Swift was the dean of the cathedral for more than 30 years.

This Victorian gem with its ornate molding and red velvet boxes is a Dublin institution, hosting a rotating schedule of stand-up comedy, big-name rock gigs, and popular theater.

What started almost three centuries ago as a humble weaving shop (in the Wicklow village of the same name) is now a retail empire.

An oasis of tranquillity in the teeming center of Dublin, this campus of wide green lawns and stately 16th-century buildings is the city’s undisputed jewel.

The library's founder, the Archbishop Narcissus Marsh, believed that everyone should have access to books on medicine, law, science, travel, navigation, mathematics, music, classical literature, and, of course, theology.

The Cobblestone is located at the top of Smithfield, near the Four Courts, in the North Inner City. The D7 area has recently become very trendy among the late '20s and early '30s and many mingle with inner city Dubliners in this convivial old bar.

There’s nothing immediately distinctive or compelling about Peter’s…but then, unassuming comfort is essential for a good Dublin pub. What is notable here is the absence of both trinkety tourist-bait décor and flickering televisions—and the presence of real neighborhood locals.

Also known as the Dublin City Gallery, this delightful and manageable contemporary art gallery is arguably the city’s finest art space. The selection of work by 20th-century Irish artists is strong (including pieces by Sir John Lavery, Jack B.

The resting place of 14 of the executed leaders of the insurrection of 1916.

Attending a true Dublin “trad session”—a group jam session featuring instruments like violin, mandolin, banjo, accordion, and uilleann pipes—is a memorable event.

The latest addition to the George’s Street scene takes a humorous angle on the current economic recession. The owners have outfitted the bar-restaurant like a tenement, with recycled furniture, a hodgepodge of tag-sale objets, and lines of hanging laundry.

The best in Irish design is showcased in this Nassau Street store, handily located between Trinity College and the National Museum on Kildare Street.

Housed in a graceful building that is itself a sort of exhibit (with classically Victorian architecture and a rotunda based on Rome’s Pantheon), this archaeological museum explores Ireland’s ancient Celtic heritage.