Dublin

Things to do in Dublin

Much of the charm of Dublin is wandering through its various neighborhoods and taking time to linger over the details of a Georgian home or the goods in, say, a traditional lace store. That said, there are some must-see sights as well.
O'Connell Street. Dublin's main thoroughfare is lined with neoclassical buildings, many with shops on their grand floors. The street was also the sight of many key battles in Ireland's uprising against British rule.
National Museum. The National Museum of Ireland is actually three museums in Dublin (as well as another one in County Mayo). Visits to all three, which focus on archeology, the decorative arts, and the history museum, will give you a nuanced overview of Ireland and its people.
Temple Bar. Head to this area south of the River Liffey to visit galleries by day and the nightlife after dark.
St. Patrick's Cathedral. The largest church in Ireland dates from the 12th century. Much of Ireland's history has played out here, including some surprising footnotes: Jonathan Swift was the dean of the cathedral for more than 30 years.

The most elegant of Dublin’s department stores stocks designer apparel from around the world. Brown Thomas has been part of the Grafton Street landscape since 1849, but shopping there today feels as au courant as a trip to Bendel’s in New York or Harvey Nichols in London.

When Paddy and Maureen O’Donoghue opened this bar in 1934, they invited local musicians to perform each night. Considered to be the birthplace of the popular group, The Dubliners, O’Donoghue’s maintains its nightly musical tradition.

What started almost three centuries ago as a humble weaving shop (in the Wicklow village of the same name) is now a retail empire.

The Cobblestone is located at the top of Smithfield, near the Four Courts, in the North Inner City. The D7 area has recently become very trendy among the late '20s and early '30s and many mingle with inner city Dubliners in this convivial old bar.

The resting place of 14 of the executed leaders of the insurrection of 1916.

The best in Irish design is showcased in this Nassau Street store, handily located between Trinity College and the National Museum on Kildare Street.

Devitts on Camden Street is a great little pub for a chat and a couple of pints. The atmosphere is relaxed and the sound of conversation is all that fills the air. The pints are great and the service is grand. The bar is quite long and the seating area is quite spacious.

This temple to the city’s renowned stout—a product that’s helped sustain Ireland’s economy for centuries—is the country’s star tourist attraction. The property, originally built in 1908 to house fermentation tanks, bears little resemblance today to the original operation.

This magnificent 1774 Georgian townhouse (which lingered in a semi-ruined state for years before it was transformed in 1981) is now one of Dublin’s most stylish shopping destinations.

One of the oldest pubs in Dublin, the Palace Bar was once frequented by such renowned writers as James Joyce, Flann O’Brien, and R.M. Smyllie, former editor of the Irish Times.

A 1960's Brutalist building set amid Trinity College's brilliant historic setting creates stark architectural contrast and delightful dissonance.

IMMA commissions site-specific works by an international roster of contemporary artists and displays them in a vast set of buildings that were once the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, founded in 1684.

Karen Crawford’s boutique originally began life on Smock Alley in Temple Bar before moving to the heart of Dublin’s fashion hub on Drury Street.