Dublin

Things to do in Dublin

Much of the charm of Dublin is wandering through its various neighborhoods and taking time to linger over the details of a Georgian home or the goods in, say, a traditional lace store. That said, there are some must-see sights as well.
O'Connell Street. Dublin's main thoroughfare is lined with neoclassical buildings, many with shops on their grand floors. The street was also the sight of many key battles in Ireland's uprising against British rule.
National Museum. The National Museum of Ireland is actually three museums in Dublin (as well as another one in County Mayo). Visits to all three, which focus on archeology, the decorative arts, and the history museum, will give you a nuanced overview of Ireland and its people.
Temple Bar. Head to this area south of the River Liffey to visit galleries by day and the nightlife after dark.
St. Patrick's Cathedral. The largest church in Ireland dates from the 12th century. Much of Ireland's history has played out here, including some surprising footnotes: Jonathan Swift was the dean of the cathedral for more than 30 years.

It’s brash and showy, but this archetypal Dawson Street bar is still well worth a visit.

At the long and narrow Cobblestone pub, in Smithfield, in the early evening and then again after dinner, musicians take turns depositing tall pints of Guinness before each member of the band.

Europe’s largest enclosed urban park—encompassing more than 1,700 acres—is set just two miles west from the city center.

The thumping heart of the Irish indie-music scene, Whelan’s is where you’ll find local heroes like Mundy, David Kitt, and Glen Hansard rubbing shoulders with students and earnest wannabe singer-songwriters at the cramped wood-paneled bar.

An old liquor store with a beveled-glass cashier's booth.

Walking into this somber, dignified Protestant church with its magnificent organ is certainly impressive—but the star attraction here is underneath your feet. After a guide opens a creaking door, revealing a dark stone staircase, you can creep down into the crypt of St.

This Victorian gem with its ornate molding and red velvet boxes is a Dublin institution, hosting a rotating schedule of stand-up comedy, big-name rock gigs, and popular theater.

Also known as the Dublin City Gallery, this delightful and manageable contemporary art gallery is arguably the city’s finest art space. The selection of work by 20th-century Irish artists is strong (including pieces by Sir John Lavery, Jack B.

The latest addition to the George’s Street scene takes a humorous angle on the current economic recession. The owners have outfitted the bar-restaurant like a tenement, with recycled furniture, a hodgepodge of tag-sale objets, and lines of hanging laundry.

The cheeses are displayed on long wooden tables and kept at a constant temperature of around 50 degrees.

Combining the city’s two most famous exports—writers and beer—this long-running tour takes thirsty readers on a two-hour spin through some of Dublin’s storied literary watering holes.

POD

Though Dublin’s better known for its pub culture than its nightclubs, this converted train station has been packing in crowds since the early 1990s.

One of the oldest in Dublin, The Stag's Head has stained-glass windows, a massive mahogany bar, and a snug—a small, enclosed space where women in the 18th century could drink and not be seen.