Dublin + The East

Things to do in Dublin + The East

One of the oldest pubs in Dublin, the Palace Bar was once frequented by such renowned writers as James Joyce, Flann O’Brien, and R.M. Smyllie, former editor of the Irish Times.

Housed in a graceful building that is itself a sort of exhibit (with classically Victorian architecture and a rotunda based on Rome’s Pantheon), this archaeological museum explores Ireland’s ancient Celtic heritage.

IMMA commissions site-specific works by an international roster of contemporary artists and displays them in a vast set of buildings that were once the Royal Hospital Kilmainham, founded in 1684.

Karen Crawford’s boutique originally began life on Smock Alley in Temple Bar before moving to the heart of Dublin’s fashion hub on Drury Street.

Europe’s largest enclosed urban park—encompassing more than 1,700 acres—is set just two miles west from the city center.

The library's founder, the Archbishop Narcissus Marsh, believed that everyone should have access to books on medicine, law, science, travel, navigation, mathematics, music, classical literature, and, of course, theology.

There’s nothing immediately distinctive or compelling about Peter’s…but then, unassuming comfort is essential for a good Dublin pub. What is notable here is the absence of both trinkety tourist-bait décor and flickering televisions—and the presence of real neighborhood locals.

Attending a true Dublin “trad session”—a group jam session featuring instruments like violin, mandolin, banjo, accordion, and uilleann pipes—is a memorable event.

Walking into this somber, dignified Protestant church with its magnificent organ is certainly impressive—but the star attraction here is underneath your feet. After a guide opens a creaking door, revealing a dark stone staircase, you can creep down into the crypt of St.

A standout collection of European masters.

It’s brash and showy, but this archetypal Dawson Street bar is still well worth a visit.

At the long and narrow Cobblestone pub, in Smithfield, in the early evening and then again after dinner, musicians take turns depositing tall pints of Guinness before each member of the band.

Also known as the Dublin City Gallery, this delightful and manageable contemporary art gallery is arguably the city’s finest art space. The selection of work by 20th-century Irish artists is strong (including pieces by Sir John Lavery, Jack B.