Dublin + The East

Dublin + The East Travel Guide

An old liquor store with a beveled-glass cashier's booth.

When Paddy and Maureen O’Donoghue opened this bar in 1934, they invited local musicians to perform each night. Considered to be the birthplace of the popular group, The Dubliners, O’Donoghue’s maintains its nightly musical tradition.

Karen Crawford’s boutique originally began life on Smock Alley in Temple Bar before moving to the heart of Dublin’s fashion hub on Drury Street.

Combining the city’s two most famous exports—writers and beer—this long-running tour takes thirsty readers on a two-hour spin through some of Dublin’s storied literary watering holes.

This temple to the city’s renowned stout—a product that’s helped sustain Ireland’s economy for centuries—is the country’s star tourist attraction. The property, originally built in 1908 to house fermentation tanks, bears little resemblance today to the original operation.

This Victorian gem with its ornate molding and red velvet boxes is a Dublin institution, hosting a rotating schedule of stand-up comedy, big-name rock gigs, and popular theater.

What started almost three centuries ago as a humble weaving shop (in the Wicklow village of the same name) is now a retail empire.

Europe’s largest enclosed urban park—encompassing more than 1,700 acres—is set just two miles west from the city center.

The library's founder, the Archbishop Narcissus Marsh, believed that everyone should have access to books on medicine, law, science, travel, navigation, mathematics, music, classical literature, and, of course, theology.

The Cobblestone is located at the top of Smithfield, near the Four Courts, in the North Inner City. The D7 area has recently become very trendy among the late '20s and early '30s and many mingle with inner city Dubliners in this convivial old bar.

There’s nothing immediately distinctive or compelling about Peter’s…but then, unassuming comfort is essential for a good Dublin pub. What is notable here is the absence of both trinkety tourist-bait décor and flickering televisions—and the presence of real neighborhood locals.

Just 35 miles south of the city, and right in the heart of the beautiful Wicklow Mountains National Park, the hamlet of Glendalough makes a magical day trip from Dublin.