Dublin + The East

Dublin + The East Travel Guide

The Cobblestone is located at the top of Smithfield, near the Four Courts, in the North Inner City. The D7 area has recently become very trendy among the late '20s and early '30s and many mingle with inner city Dubliners in this convivial old bar.

There’s nothing immediately distinctive or compelling about Peter’s…but then, unassuming comfort is essential for a good Dublin pub. What is notable here is the absence of both trinkety tourist-bait décor and flickering televisions—and the presence of real neighborhood locals.

Just 35 miles south of the city, and right in the heart of the beautiful Wicklow Mountains National Park, the hamlet of Glendalough makes a magical day trip from Dublin.

A 1960's Brutalist building set amid Trinity College's brilliant historic setting creates stark architectural contrast and delightful dissonance.

The resting place of 14 of the executed leaders of the insurrection of 1916.

Attending a true Dublin “trad session”—a group jam session featuring instruments like violin, mandolin, banjo, accordion, and uilleann pipes—is a memorable event.

The latest addition to the George’s Street scene takes a humorous angle on the current economic recession. The owners have outfitted the bar-restaurant like a tenement, with recycled furniture, a hodgepodge of tag-sale objets, and lines of hanging laundry.

The best in Irish design is showcased in this Nassau Street store, handily located between Trinity College and the National Museum on Kildare Street.

Walking into this somber, dignified Protestant church with its magnificent organ is certainly impressive—but the star attraction here is underneath your feet. After a guide opens a creaking door, revealing a dark stone staircase, you can creep down into the crypt of St.

A standout collection of European masters.

The cheeses are displayed on long wooden tables and kept at a constant temperature of around 50 degrees.

Devitts on Camden Street is a great little pub for a chat and a couple of pints. The atmosphere is relaxed and the sound of conversation is all that fills the air. The pints are great and the service is grand. The bar is quite long and the seating area is quite spacious.

It’s brash and showy, but this archetypal Dawson Street bar is still well worth a visit.

To the north of Dublin, the rural county of Meath and the Boyne Valley comprise an area rich with ancient sites. The best known among these is Newgrange, a 5,000-year-old passage tomb and ancient temple that predates Stonehenge (it’s part of a larger complex called Brú na Bóinne).

An oasis of tranquillity in the teeming center of Dublin, this campus of wide green lawns and stately 16th-century buildings is the city’s undisputed jewel.