Dublin + The East

Restaurants in Dublin + The East

No visit to Dublin is complete without a taste of the city’s signature treat: a bag of greasy, deliciously crunchy fried cod and chips.

Chef Aine Maguire is one of the rising stars of the Irish food scene (a fact that Michelin recognized by awarding The Winding Stair its Bib Gourmand in 2008).

Ely

As one-third of the Ely group of restaurants, this wine bar supplies guests with 400 options by the bottle, of which, nearly 100 are served by the glass.

A newly opened offshoot of the eponymous oyster bar in London, this Bentley’s marks a return of Irish chef Richard Corrigan to his native turf.

The Quartier Bloom is Dublin’s small, but busy Italian district. It is home to a handful of shops and restaurants, one of which is the wine-focused Enoteca delle Langhe.

In the back are stained-glass windows, designed by the early-20th-century craftsman Harry Clarke, glowing with parrots and feathery foliage.

For almost 30 years, Cognac native Patrick Guilbaud has dominated Dublin’s culinary landscape—and with good reason.

Featured on television and in books, Chef Kevin Thornton had made his mission clear to incorporate Irish ingredients into modern cuisine.

Suffused with an understated attitude of perennial hipness, the Mermaid has been an oasis of cool since it opened in 1996. The space is bright, clean, and contemporary, and Gavin Pedersen’s menu—which falls somewhere along the culinary spectrum between Ireland and New England—follows suit.

The Irish comfort food at Roly’s is served in a dining room with yellow-painted walls, white linen-covered tables, and maroon banquettes. Located directly above its bakery and all-day café, which serves coffee and homemade pastries, it has been open since 1992.

At Michelle Darmody's Cake Café, a restaurant in the Portobello neighborhood, the building was designed to be sustainable and with materials that were apparently "healthy and organic," as indeed is the food.

Dublin diners were hardly surprised when Chapter One was awarded a Michelin star in 2007; in fact, many wondered why the recognition for this hidden gem had taken so long.

Down a few steps, into what was once Mitchell’s Wine Merchants, this underground cellar is now the location of the upscale Italian restaurant, Town Bar and Grill.

A dramatic restaurant setting can often mean underwhelming food—but Quay 16 is a happy exception to this rule.