Dublin + The East

Things to do in Dublin + The East

An old liquor store with a beveled-glass cashier's booth.

Combining the city’s two most famous exports—writers and beer—this long-running tour takes thirsty readers on a two-hour spin through some of Dublin’s storied literary watering holes.

This Victorian gem with its ornate molding and red velvet boxes is a Dublin institution, hosting a rotating schedule of stand-up comedy, big-name rock gigs, and popular theater.

Just 35 miles south of the city, and right in the heart of the beautiful Wicklow Mountains National Park, the hamlet of Glendalough makes a magical day trip from Dublin.

The latest addition to the George’s Street scene takes a humorous angle on the current economic recession. The owners have outfitted the bar-restaurant like a tenement, with recycled furniture, a hodgepodge of tag-sale objets, and lines of hanging laundry.

The cheeses are displayed on long wooden tables and kept at a constant temperature of around 50 degrees.

To the north of Dublin, the rural county of Meath and the Boyne Valley comprise an area rich with ancient sites. The best known among these is Newgrange, a 5,000-year-old passage tomb and ancient temple that predates Stonehenge (it’s part of a larger complex called Brú na Bóinne).

POD

Though Dublin’s better known for its pub culture than its nightclubs, this converted train station has been packing in crowds since the early 1990s.

One of the oldest in Dublin, The Stag's Head has stained-glass windows, a massive mahogany bar, and a snug—a small, enclosed space where women in the 18th century could drink and not be seen.

The most elegant of Dublin’s department stores stocks designer apparel from around the world. Brown Thomas has been part of the Grafton Street landscape since 1849, but shopping there today feels as au courant as a trip to Bendel’s in New York or Harvey Nichols in London.

When Paddy and Maureen O’Donoghue opened this bar in 1934, they invited local musicians to perform each night. Considered to be the birthplace of the popular group, The Dubliners, O’Donoghue’s maintains its nightly musical tradition.

This temple to the city’s renowned stout—a product that’s helped sustain Ireland’s economy for centuries—is the country’s star tourist attraction. The property, originally built in 1908 to house fermentation tanks, bears little resemblance today to the original operation.

What started almost three centuries ago as a humble weaving shop (in the Wicklow village of the same name) is now a retail empire.