Dublin Travel Guide

Dublin Travel Guide

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Dublin has changed a lot over the past few years—the recession hit the city hard—but it’s emerging now as a strong, vibrant town with so much to offe... Read More

Dublin has changed a lot over the past few years—the recession hit the city hard—but it’s emerging now as a strong, vibrant town with so much to offer. There are excellent restaurants, world-class theaters, and lively nightlife—and, of course, storied old pubs, where you can encounter funny, gregarious locals in their natural habitat. The cobblestoned streets, the splendid towers of Trinity College, and the gracious squares of Georgian Dublin still echo with history—but the high-tech boom of the past decade has radically changed the face of the city, particularly in the shining new Docklands area.

Every year, visitors flock to Dublin in droves; some to pay homage to their roots, some to rediscover the city they know and love, and others to see it all for the first time. Alongside the enduring hot spots that have stood the test of time, exciting new places are consistently popping up, from quirky cocktail bars to creative restaurants.

Unlike some other capital cities, it is easy to explore Dublin on foot (don't forget an umbrella, as even sunny days often have a passing shower or two). Our Dublin travel guide will lead you to the historic sites, but at the end of the day, grab a seat in a pub, order a Guinness, and find yourself drawn into a conversation with new friends—it’ll be the most memorable part of your trip to Dublin.

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Visit Dublin

Best Time To Go

There’s no need to choose a time to visit based on the weather, since it is fairly consistent year-round. September and October are typically the fairest, and you’ll also avoid the hectic summer crowds.

Transportation

The city center is small enough to be tackled on foot with ease, and unless you’re staying in the outer boroughs, you probably won’t need to use the Luas trams or city buses. If you do, bear in mind that bus drivers cannot give change, so have your coins ready for short journeys—fares start at €2. You can buy a tourist Leap card for ease—one day of unlimited travel is €10.

Weather

The Irish climate is fairly uniform throughout the year—even in July, the hottest month, temperatures are usually around 60°F. January is the coldest month, with averages of 41°F, and there’s frequent rainfall at any time.

Know Before You Go

For busier attractions (the Book of Kells at Trinity and the Guinness Storehouse), it’s worth buying tickets online prior to arrival—you’ll be able to skip lines and save time. Come nightfall, the Temple Bar district is incredibly rowdy—it’s best to stick to the charming pubs in the city instead of the overpriced and touristy ones.

Language

English

Electric

Type G (three-prong plug)

Currency

Euro (€)

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