Detroit

Restaurants in Detroit

Whether it’s a classic culinary temple or a local haunt, these Detroit restaurants are destinations in and of themselves. Read on to discover Travel + Leisure’s picks for the best Detroit restaurants and dining experiences. Browse our travel guides for insider information on food trucks, bakeries, cafés, coffeehouses, farm-to-table restaurants, diners, trattorias, bistros, pizzerias, ice cream parlors, tapas bars, noodle houses, sushi counters, fine dining establishments, and more.

Our global network of editors and writers selects the best restaurants in Detroit to help travelers soak up the local scene and find authentic dishes. Whether highlighting an insider hot spot, a celebrity chef’s newest restaurant, a hip coffeehouse, or the best place for cheap eats, Travel + Leisure takes you there, serving up the best Detroit restaurant listings. Below find T+L’s top picks for where to eat in Detroit.

New Three Star BarBQ is the place to go for dry-rubbed ribs and a cold brew in Hamtramck. Located on Joseph Campau Street, this modest, three-generation diner has tile flooring and Tiffany-style lamps, and is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

The waterfalls, teak walls, and plentiful marble touches are giveaways that Mosaic is no ordinary Greektown restaurant. Uprooting their baklava and pastiso roots, the trio of sisters who own the place opted for a menu and atmosphere that’s sleek and modern.

The breakfast and lunch choice of CEO’s, judges, government officials, and other power people is designed to resemble a contemporary yet cozy living room. Bright pastels and plasma TV’s adorn the walls, and there’s even a fireplace in the foyer.

A basement restaurant with a Central Europe style, the Polish Village Café was featured on the Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. Look for the sign with the name and a black rooster hanging over the red awning of 2990 Yemans.

Vicentes feels a bit like an old-fashioned supper club, with blond wood chairs, tables covered in a striking shade of burgundy, and a dance floor that comes alive with salsa music after 10 p.m. on weekends.

Drive or boat up to this restaurant in the Marina District of the Detroit River. The two-story building with many windows has 36 boat wells available for restaurant guests.

Detroit’s late-19th-century heyday is on display in this pink granite, 52-room mansion, originally built in 1894 for lumber baron David Whitney.

Despite being owned by Jimmy Schmidt, Detroit’s best known chef, Rattlesnake Club is somewhat of a foodies’ secret, tucked away on a side street just east of downtown.

As the name indicates, Evie’s is famous for its tamales—the real meat-or-cheese-filled kind that practically fall apart with tenderness when you pop them in your mouth.

Crowded with Formica tables that have seen better days, Lafayette Coney is a beloved institution that seems to have been in Detroit as long as its eponymous river.