Denmark

Restaurants in Denmark

Located in the Tivoli Gardens, the Nimb Brasserie serves Scandinavian cuisine from its three open kitchens at the center of the dining room. Floor-to-ceiling rooms provide both garden views and natural light to accompany the low hanging, brightly colored lamp shades above each long table.

Specializes in straightforward brasserie food served alongside avant-garde art installations from the likes of Olafur Eliasson.

What happens when you cross sushi with smørrebrød? Dainty “smushi” at this Moderne-Baroque space just off the city’s main shopping drag. Try the ham salad with quail eggs.

Copenhagen’s answer to Manhattan’s posh Nobu, Umami is a French and Japanese fusion restaurant and sushi bar that has become a magnet for the celebrities and the city’s elite.

Michelin-starred chef Francis Cardnau and partners Jesper Boelskifte and Erik Witting operate this popular French bistro and wine bar, just south of the Danish Museum of Art & Design.

Literally meaning "forwards and backwards," Forlaens & Baglaens is a small tapas bar serving authentic Spanish-inspired dishes predominately centered on fish and homemade breads. Tables and chairs are arranged close together in a cozy, casual atmosphere that is conducive to sharing.

This café and movie theater is known to stream live opera from Milan’s La Scala.

Known for its cheap beer and laid back vibe, Woodstock was the liberal freetown of Christiania's very first bar and offers beer at 16kr while allowing patrons to smoke their herb of choice outside.

Housed inside the Hotel Nimb, Michelin one-starred Restaurant Herman serves cuisine that pays tribute to the culinary traditions of the Danish countryside.

Owned by four siblings, this popular Vietnamese restaurant serves cuisine heavily influenced by the culinary traditions of southern Vietnam.

The excellent bobo restaurant, housed in a 19th-century warehouse, serves reindeer over roasted organic mushrooms with berry and aniseed sauce.

Smorrebrod (which translates as "bread and butter") is the classic Danish lunch, consisting of a piece of bread with a variety of toppings—essentially, an open-face sandwich.

Frederik Hvidt is the city's rising culinary star—just ask his fellow chefs, who gather at his restaurant when their own kitchens are closed. The five-course, surprisingly affordable prix fixe menu elevates classic ingredients (lamb, cod) to their finest.