Dallas

Restaurants in Dallas

When you think of Dallas restaurants, perhaps the first images that come to mind are steak and barbeque. No doubt, you'll be able to find both. But restaurants In Dallas go beyond those staples. Dean Fearing, one of the legendary figures of American cuisine, long helmed the kitchen at the Mansion on Turtle Creek—you can find him now at Fearing's, at the Ritz-Carlton Dallas. The best restaurants in Dallas also include a number of Mexican favorites and, as would be expected in one of the country's most populous cities, the entire range of international cuisines.

At the popular Local, chef Tracy Miller serves innovative dishes to a fashionable crowd (burgers come with panko tator tots; sea bass is prepared in a cornflakes crust). Dragonfly at the Hotel ZaZa refuses to take its food too seriously, which is not that it's anything less than delicious. Lamb lollipops and achiote marinated duck breast are highlights of the menu.

Though this North Henderson dining room has been open for years, Hibiscus’s charm continues to attract Lone Star foodies. A touch rustic in design, the main dinning area features warm wood floors, a cozy fireplace, and an open kitchen that is partially enclosed by a brick wall.

Originally built as a private estate in 1908, the Rosewood Mansion is now an iconic Uptown hotel housing one of the city’s most popular restaurants. The Mansion’s guests can dine inside the honey-colored dining room or outside on the candlelit terrace.

Seamlessly blending the cuisines of Europe and Latin America, owners and Dallas food stars Espartaco and Dunia Borga create soul-warming comfort favorites like roasted half-chicken with black beans and plantains or huevos rancheros with homemade corn tortillas in their McKinney Avenue kitchen.

Don’t let the dive bar ambiance fool you; Lee Harvey’s is as fit for foodies as it is for beer enthusiasts.

Patrons enjoy stellar views of the Dallas skyline from Nana’s location on the 27th floor of the Hilton Anatole in Market Center. Floor-to-ceiling windows distract diners on one side of the stylish restaurant while those on the other side can survey handpicked pieces of Asian art.

Throw dieting out the window and indulge in decadent Low Country cuisine at this sunny, sophisticated eatery in Oak Cliff’s Bishop Arts District.

The original of what is now a widespread chain of steakhouses, this Lemmon Avenue landmark is outfitted with dark wood paneling, leather upholstered furniture, and dim lighting.

"Western chic" is how many describe this eclectic restaurant, whose interior juxtaposes natural woods, hanging antlers, and farm tables next to crystal chandeliers and lounge seating that is covered in bright red fabric and modern throw pillows.

A twinkling Christmas tree, ghoulish Halloween décor, flowered drapery, colorful foam-cushioned bar seating and a cozy patio lined with toilet planters make this Deep Ellum double wide one of the most unique party spots in Dallas.

Established in 1958, this family-owned barbecue joint is now a popular chain with locations throughout the Lone Star State (there’s even an outpost in Sandy, Utah).

Master chef Teiichi Sakurai spent time in Tokyo honing the art of the buckwheat noodle for his soba restaurant.