Dallas

Restaurants in Dallas

When you think of Dallas restaurants, perhaps the first images that come to mind are steak and barbeque. No doubt, you'll be able to find both. But restaurants In Dallas go beyond those staples. Dean Fearing, one of the legendary figures of American cuisine, long helmed the kitchen at the Mansion on Turtle Creek—you can find him now at Fearing's, at the Ritz-Carlton Dallas. The best restaurants in Dallas also include a number of Mexican favorites and, as would be expected in one of the country's most populous cities, the entire range of international cuisines.

At the popular Local, chef Tracy Miller serves innovative dishes to a fashionable crowd (burgers come with panko tator tots; sea bass is prepared in a cornflakes crust). Dragonfly at the Hotel ZaZa refuses to take its food too seriously, which is not that it's anything less than delicious. Lamb lollipops and achiote marinated duck breast are highlights of the menu.

Dallas veteran and Top Chef contestant John Tesar opened this seafood restaurant to rave reviews. Crisp, clean interiors let artful plates—fluke sashimi with blood orange and fennel; king crab garden salad—take center stage.

A twinkling Christmas tree, ghoulish Halloween décor, flowered drapery, colorful foam-cushioned bar seating and a cozy patio lined with toilet planters make this Deep Ellum double wide one of the most unique party spots in Dallas.

Established in 1958, this family-owned barbecue joint is now a popular chain with locations throughout the Lone Star State (there’s even an outpost in Sandy, Utah).

Master chef Teiichi Sakurai spent time in Tokyo honing the art of the buckwheat noodle for his soba restaurant.

Sultry groove meets scrumptious gourmet at the Brooklyn Jazz Café, a low-key neighborhood restaurant in South Dallas.

Chef Tracy Miller ensconced her masterpiece, Local, in the ground floor of Dallas's Boyd Hotel in 2003. Since then, Local has been delighting, well, locals with its inspired menu of modern American cuisine.

Alo

Hip Mexican-Peruvian street food

Located in Dallas's vibrant University Park neighborhood, Shinsei's name translates as "rebirth" or "new beginning.” Inside, the sushi bar and Pan Asian restaurant boasts bright green banquettes, a hand cut wood foyer, and candle-lit tables.

Italian restaurateur Efisio Farris has been cooking since he was a little boy in his mother’s kitchen in his native Sardinia, and he partners with executive chef Luciano Salvadore to present Sardinian flavors in dishes such as raviolis and carpaccios.

Under the leadership of executive chef Amador Mora, Trece Mexican Kitchen and Tequila Bar is a neighborhood favorite in Uptown.

Café San Miguel is an upscale, new-style Mexican restaurant that offers authentic fare and homemade staples like corn tortillas, chips, and salsas. Wooden tables and bright yellow and orange hues set the atmosphere, and outdoor seating is available.

Located in the Arts District, Stephan Pyles derives its name from its chef, Esquire Magazine's 2006 Chef of the Year and the "father of Southwestern cuisine." The walls of the dining room feature terra-cotta bricks from the original 1963 building, as well as artwork from local Dallas artists, but