Dallas

Restaurants in Dallas

Dallas veteran and Top Chef contestant John Tesar opened this seafood restaurant to rave reviews. Crisp, clean interiors let artful plates—fluke sashimi with blood orange and fennel; king crab garden salad—take center stage.

Though this North Henderson dining room has been open for years, Hibiscus’s charm continues to attract Lone Star foodies. A touch rustic in design, the main dinning area features warm wood floors, a cozy fireplace, and an open kitchen that is partially enclosed by a brick wall.

Established in 1958, this family-owned barbecue joint is now a popular chain with locations throughout the Lone Star State (there’s even an outpost in Sandy, Utah).

Under the leadership of executive chef Amador Mora, Trece Mexican Kitchen and Tequila Bar is a neighborhood favorite in Uptown.

Originally built as a private estate in 1908, the Rosewood Mansion is now an iconic Uptown hotel housing one of the city’s most popular restaurants. The Mansion’s guests can dine inside the honey-colored dining room or outside on the candlelit terrace.

Master chef Teiichi Sakurai spent time in Tokyo honing the art of the buckwheat noodle for his soba restaurant.

Café San Miguel is an upscale, new-style Mexican restaurant that offers authentic fare and homemade staples like corn tortillas, chips, and salsas. Wooden tables and bright yellow and orange hues set the atmosphere, and outdoor seating is available.

Sultry groove meets scrumptious gourmet at the Brooklyn Jazz Café, a low-key neighborhood restaurant in South Dallas.

Seamlessly blending the cuisines of Europe and Latin America, owners and Dallas food stars Espartaco and Dunia Borga create soul-warming comfort favorites like roasted half-chicken with black beans and plantains or huevos rancheros with homemade corn tortillas in their McKinney Avenue kitchen.

Located in the Arts District, Stephan Pyles derives its name from its chef, Esquire Magazine's 2006 Chef of the Year and the "father of Southwestern cuisine." The walls of the dining room feature terra-cotta bricks from the original 1963 building, as well as artwork from local Dallas artists, but

Don’t let the dive bar ambiance fool you; Lee Harvey’s is as fit for foodies as it is for beer enthusiasts.