Dallas/Ft. Worth

Restaurants in Dallas/Ft. Worth

Dallas veteran and Top Chef contestant John Tesar opened this seafood restaurant to rave reviews. Crisp, clean interiors let artful plates—fluke sashimi with blood orange and fennel; king crab garden salad—take center stage.

Joe T.’s—as the residents call it—originally opened in 1935 and continues to be packed with locals and visitors clamoring for margaritas, chile rellenos, and tamales. Grab a patio seat if one is available. 

A North Dallas landmark for more than 20 years, the original Del Frisco’s is known for its date-worthy atmosphere and exquisite cuisine. Dark mahogany, brass chandeliers, fireplaces, and subdued lighting provide masculine touches to the main dining room, divided into upper and lower levels.

Master chef Teiichi Sakurai spent time in Tokyo honing the art of the buckwheat noodle for his soba restaurant.

Established by Butch and Ana Enriquez in 1981, this Lemmon Avenue landmark serves homemade traditional Tex-Mex cuisine to customers ranging from Dallas Cowboys and movie stars to in-the-know tourists.

Italian restaurateur Efisio Farris has been cooking since he was a little boy in his mother’s kitchen in his native Sardinia, and he partners with executive chef Luciano Salvadore to present Sardinian flavors in dishes such as raviolis and carpaccios.

Originally built as a private estate in 1908, the Rosewood Mansion is now an iconic Uptown hotel housing one of the city’s most popular restaurants. The Mansion’s guests can dine inside the honey-colored dining room or outside on the candlelit terrace.

Not everyone—or, really, anyone—earns a nickname from Tom Colicchio, but finalist Casey Thompson was known as “Case” by Season 3’s end. Now the born-and-bred Texan helms the new Brownstone restaurant in Fort Worth, where her southern roots have a strong influence.

A North Dallas tradition since 1938, this family-owned café is located in a renovated red-brick house that maintains residential elements such as original bathtubs.

Café San Miguel is an upscale, new-style Mexican restaurant that offers authentic fare and homemade staples like corn tortillas, chips, and salsas. Wooden tables and bright yellow and orange hues set the atmosphere, and outdoor seating is available.

Don’t let the dive bar ambiance fool you; Lee Harvey’s is as fit for foodies as it is for beer enthusiasts.

Located uptown inside the boutique Hotel ZaZa, Dragonfly’s dining room is marked by graphic Piero Fornasetti wallpaper, framed photographs and artwork, and clean, sharp lines. Dozens of pendant lights hang at different lengths near the bar, forming a partition from the dining room.