Costa Rica

Costa Rica Travel Guide

This long established agency can organize botany, birding, or photography tours, and more.

Functional, beautiful objects made from rainforest woods are created on site at this small store and wood shop run by American craftsman Barry Biesanz. Among the offerings are painstakingly made and richly colored humidors, jewelry boxes, credit card cases, and comb sets.

Coffee is king in Costa Rica—and of the nearly 150,000 large and small coffee fincas (plantations) that dot the Costa Rican landscape (most in the Central Valley), Café Britt is the best place to learn about it.

With its zip-line canopy tours, Selvatura brings you eye-to-eye with birds that occupy the rainforest treetops—and lets you fly like one yourself.

Corcovado’s 127,000 acres of lush primary rainforest protect an extraordinary array of wildlife.

Take a spectacular sunset, throw in a sexy clientele, live music on the beach, finely mixed cocktails, and a reliable party-food menu, and you have The Backyard: one of the Pacific Coast’s better spots for a beach fiesta.

Years as agent: 13. Specialties: Costa Rica, Soft adventure. Consulting fee: None.

The reserve protects 815 acres of coastal rain forest. Look for capuchin monkeys, toucans, and three-toed sloths along the reserve's well-groomed trails.

One of the most remote areas in Costa Rica, this 47,000-acre coastal preserve—which encompasses an intricate series of jungle canals, lagoons, and beaches—is reachable only by boat or plane.

With nearly 200 different shops and studios selling painted boxes and trays, jewelry, furniture, textiles, and carved wood utensils, the town of Sarchí is Costa Rica’s crafts hub.

Many of the nearly 400 bird species at Rara Avis can be found nowhere else in the world. Costa Rica’s first reserve, this is the place that kicked off the country’s ecotourism movement when it opened in 1983.

A 1.7-mile zipline network in the Monteverde Reserve operated by Costa Rica Sky Adventures gives airborne guests close-up glimpses of forest-dwelling mammals, like the fuzzy brown martilla, as well as views of the smoldering Arenal Volcano.

For the super-active family with older kids, the company has introduced teen-focused itineraries that include surfing, photography, and salsa dancing.

Just south of Quepos on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica are a series of wide, white-sand beaches backed by dense, tropical forest, mangrove swamps, and lagoons that serve as the home for hundreds of species of animals such as sloths, iguanas, and rare squirrel monkeys.