Copenhagen

Copenhagen Travel Guide

Located on the Stroget (High Street) of Aarhus, Denmark's second-largest city, Geog Jensen Damask is the Danish luxury brand's primary outlet for linens.

Don't try to find American-style Danishes (raised dough, fruity filling)—there's no such thing in Copenhagen. Summerbird is known for its flødeboller (snowballs), delicious confections of marshmallow cream and dark chocolate atop a marzipan base.

On Monday nights, the canal-side wine bar becomes the hangout for the city’s culinary scene. A guest cook—sometimes from Noma or Relae—prepares a simple, tasty one-pot dish that functions like a staff meal, except it’s open to all.

A compact museum filled with the collection amassed by Carl Jacobsen (founder of Carlsberg beer), including ancient sculptures and more than 40 Gauguin canvases. Highly recommended: coffee and marzipan cake in the domed, flower-filled Winter Garden café.

Spend an hour at this museum for a highly informative tour of the city’s thousand-year history.

The Fisketorvet Shopping Center is the first of its kind in the city. Housed in the former location of the Copenhagen fish market, the four-story shopping mall overlooks the water and offers shoppers stunning views.

Housed in a three-story, corner-spanning, early 20th-century building just a few blocks from Stroget (Copenhagen's central shopping street), Arnold Busck is the flagship edition of a bookstore chain that boasts outlets all over Denmark.

Open since 2004, Aros Aarthus Kunstmuseum is one of Northern Europe's largest art museums, with 17,000 square meters of exhibition space.

Behind a windowless, black tile facade adorned only with the bar's name in white tile, patrons of Rust discover three floors of bars, a dance floor where DJs spin four nights a week, and a stage for live concerts by up-and-coming alternative acts.

The resort-influenced collection—all flirty caftan dresses in bold prints, diaphanous silk shirts, and wide-leg trousers—brings to mind Bianca Jagger circa 1972.