Copenhagen

Copenhagen Travel Guide

Located on the Stroget (High Street) of Aarhus, Denmark's second-largest city, Geog Jensen Damask is the Danish luxury brand's primary outlet for linens.

Don't try to find American-style Danishes (raised dough, fruity filling)—there's no such thing in Copenhagen. Summerbird is known for its flødeboller (snowballs), delicious confections of marshmallow cream and dark chocolate atop a marzipan base.

A compact museum filled with the collection amassed by Carl Jacobsen (founder of Carlsberg beer), including ancient sculptures and more than 40 Gauguin canvases. Highly recommended: coffee and marzipan cake in the domed, flower-filled Winter Garden café.

On Monday nights, the canal-side wine bar becomes the hangout for the city’s culinary scene. A guest cook—sometimes from Noma or Relae—prepares a simple, tasty one-pot dish that functions like a staff meal, except it’s open to all.

Spend an hour at this museum for a highly informative tour of the city’s thousand-year history.

The Fisketorvet Shopping Center is the first of its kind in the city. Housed in the former location of the Copenhagen fish market, the four-story shopping mall overlooks the water and offers shoppers stunning views.

Open since 2004, Aros Aarthus Kunstmuseum is one of Northern Europe's largest art museums, with 17,000 square meters of exhibition space.

Housed in a three-story, corner-spanning, early 20th-century building just a few blocks from Stroget (Copenhagen's central shopping street), Arnold Busck is the flagship edition of a bookstore chain that boasts outlets all over Denmark.

Behind a windowless, black tile facade adorned only with the bar's name in white tile, patrons of Rust discover three floors of bars, a dance floor where DJs spin four nights a week, and a stage for live concerts by up-and-coming alternative acts.

The resort-influenced collection—all flirty caftan dresses in bold prints, diaphanous silk shirts, and wide-leg trousers—brings to mind Bianca Jagger circa 1972.