Copenhagen

Restaurants in Copenhagen

In Copenhagen, you can eat well whatever your budget. Some of the country's most famous dishes are ideal for frugal travelers: the classic open-faced sandwich, the smørrebrød; Danish pastries, especially the snegl, or snail, a cinnamon treat covered in icing; and the hot dog (the organic ones at Døp are especially popular). Bakeries abound that will sell you a whole grain loaf—the essential beginning of a harbor-front picnic. But when you are ready to splurge, the city also has 13 Michelin-starred restaurants. While Americans may associate amusement parks with overpriced nachos and burgers, Tivoli Gardens is home to a number of excellent restaurants, including one of those honored with a Michelin star: Nimb. Chef Thomas Herman serves a multi-course tasting menu in the main dining room while a la carte options are available at the Brasserie overlooking Tivoli. At Noma, in the Opera House, chef Rene Redzepi takes local ingredients and turns food into theater: radishes arrive planted in malt "soil," preserved fish appear to "swim" through pancakes. This theater, however, costs more than a Broadway show with tasting menus at around $240.

Emmerys, a local chain of bakeries and cafés, is known for its organic bread and baked goods. Metal shelves along the white-tiled walls are lined with assorted domestic and imported food items, such as gourmet chocolates, wine and beer, pestos, and teas, many of which are also organic.

A fashionable café with all the trappings of a proper French bistro (leather banquettes; brass fixtures; walls of mirrors). But here you'll find both croque monsieur and pickled herring—along with Copenhagen's best people-watching from outdoor tables.

The Danish open-faced sandwich has entered a new golden age. Exhibit A: the jewel-like creations at Aamanns, particularly the artful assemblage of cured silver eel, a poached quail egg, and a flourish of asparagus (marinated in a tangy-sweet grapefruit vinaigrette) on Aamanns’ own dark bread.

Located in Christiania, Manefiskeren (Moonfisher in English) is one of the area's most popular hangouts.

Literally meaning "forwards and backwards," Forlaens & Baglaens is a small tapas bar serving authentic Spanish-inspired dishes predominately centered on fish and homemade breads. Tables and chairs are arranged close together in a cozy, casual atmosphere that is conducive to sharing.

This 2010 restaurant opened to raves last year inside the now-trendy former slaughterhouse complex. Despite the tile walls and meat hooks used for coat hangers, this industrial-chic space trades in seafood with an artful Scandinavian twist.

The excellent bobo restaurant, housed in a 19th-century warehouse, serves reindeer over roasted organic mushrooms with berry and aniseed sauce.

The after-work spot for theater people, this restaurant and bar is situated on a houseboat in Christianshavn.

Husband and wife team Rikke Malling and head chef Thorsten Schmidt have achieved notoriety with their namesake restaurant since 2005.

Book way ahead at this 1877 institution and order the halibut with truffled-egg sandwiches. To drink: a selection of four dozen aquavits.

Les Trois Cochons, which means “the three pigs,” is a French-inspired eatery housed inside a repurposed butcher shop. The menu includes a selection of classic French dishes, including foie gras and steak frites, and a selection of red and white wines is available.

Named for Denmark's most famous philospher, Soren K is located on the first floor of the ultramodern Black Diamond addition to the city's Royal Library. Glass walls on one side afford unobstructed views of the nearby city entrance canal.