Copenhagen

Restaurants in Copenhagen

In Copenhagen, you can eat well whatever your budget. Some of the country's most famous dishes are ideal for frugal travelers: the classic open-faced sandwich, the smørrebrød; Danish pastries, especially the snegl, or snail, a cinnamon treat covered in icing; and the hot dog (the organic ones at Døp are especially popular). Bakeries abound that will sell you a whole grain loaf—the essential beginning of a harbor-front picnic. But when you are ready to splurge, the city also has 13 Michelin-starred restaurants. While Americans may associate amusement parks with overpriced nachos and burgers, Tivoli Gardens is home to a number of excellent restaurants, including one of those honored with a Michelin star: Nimb. Chef Thomas Herman serves a multi-course tasting menu in the main dining room while a la carte options are available at the Brasserie overlooking Tivoli. At Noma, in the Opera House, chef Rene Redzepi takes local ingredients and turns food into theater: radishes arrive planted in malt "soil," preserved fish appear to "swim" through pancakes. This theater, however, costs more than a Broadway show with tasting menus at around $240.

Owned by four siblings, this popular Vietnamese restaurant serves cuisine heavily influenced by the culinary traditions of southern Vietnam.

Frederik Hvidt is the city's rising culinary star—just ask his fellow chefs, who gather at his restaurant when their own kitchens are closed. The five-course, surprisingly affordable prix fixe menu elevates classic ingredients (lamb, cod) to their finest.

A Michelin one-starred restaurant, Formel B serves Danish and French fusion cuisine crafted by its chefs, Kristian Møller and Rune Jochumsen. Møller and Jochumsen are almost fanatical about the freshness of their ingredients, sourcing many from their own farms.

Café Nemoland had its beginnings as a fruit and vegetable store managed by a guy named Nemo, who used old military barracks for storage space.

Grab a seat at a long, communal drafting table, and you suddenly find yourself at a boisterous dinner party with all the right people. The seasonal menu, a fantastic value, blends Danish and French cuisine (cod with horseradish and bacon, créme brulée).

The local favorite Cofoco recently opened this tiny outpost, where the menu changes daily. Try the Sicilian meatballs with pine nuts, or a classic French onion soup.

A vegetarian restaurant that has been open for over 20 years, Morgenstedet is a small cottage with a whitewashed exterior that's surrounded by a pebbled yard and a garden with wooden tables.

Emmerys, a local chain of bakeries and cafés, is known for its organic bread and baked goods. Metal shelves along the white-tiled walls are lined with assorted domestic and imported food items, such as gourmet chocolates, wine and beer, pestos, and teas, many of which are also organic.

A fashionable café with all the trappings of a proper French bistro (leather banquettes; brass fixtures; walls of mirrors). But here you'll find both croque monsieur and pickled herring—along with Copenhagen's best people-watching from outdoor tables.

The Danish open-faced sandwich has entered a new golden age. Exhibit A: the jewel-like creations at Aamanns, particularly the artful assemblage of cured silver eel, a poached quail egg, and a flourish of asparagus (marinated in a tangy-sweet grapefruit vinaigrette) on Aamanns’ own dark bread.

Located in Christiania, Manefiskeren (Moonfisher in English) is one of the area's most popular hangouts.

Literally meaning "forwards and backwards," Forlaens & Baglaens is a small tapas bar serving authentic Spanish-inspired dishes predominately centered on fish and homemade breads. Tables and chairs are arranged close together in a cozy, casual atmosphere that is conducive to sharing.