Copenhagen

Restaurants in Copenhagen

In Copenhagen, you can eat well whatever your budget. Some of the country's most famous dishes are ideal for frugal travelers: the classic open-faced sandwich, the smørrebrød; Danish pastries, especially the snegl, or snail, a cinnamon treat covered in icing; and the hot dog (the organic ones at Døp are especially popular). Bakeries abound that will sell you a whole grain loaf—the essential beginning of a harbor-front picnic. But when you are ready to splurge, the city also has 13 Michelin-starred restaurants. While Americans may associate amusement parks with overpriced nachos and burgers, Tivoli Gardens is home to a number of excellent restaurants, including one of those honored with a Michelin star: Nimb. Chef Thomas Herman serves a multi-course tasting menu in the main dining room while a la carte options are available at the Brasserie overlooking Tivoli. At Noma, in the Opera House, chef Rene Redzepi takes local ingredients and turns food into theater: radishes arrive planted in malt "soil," preserved fish appear to "swim" through pancakes. This theater, however, costs more than a Broadway show with tasting menus at around $240.

Les Trois Cochons, which means “the three pigs,” is a French-inspired eatery housed inside a repurposed butcher shop. The menu includes a selection of classic French dishes, including foie gras and steak frites, and a selection of red and white wines is available.

Named for Denmark's most famous philospher, Soren K is located on the first floor of the ultramodern Black Diamond addition to the city's Royal Library. Glass walls on one side afford unobstructed views of the nearby city entrance canal.

Located in the Tivoli Gardens, the Nimb Brasserie serves Scandinavian cuisine from its three open kitchens at the center of the dining room. Floor-to-ceiling rooms provide both garden views and natural light to accompany the low hanging, brightly colored lamp shades above each long table.

Owned by brothers Jesper, Michael, and Lasse Koch, Restaurant Koch overlooks the harbor in Aarhus. The restaurant has an upscale brasserie feel and serves international dishes carefully prepared by the brothers themselves.

The café and adjoining bookshop are perfect for getting work done.

Named for the abbrevation of “first floor, on the right,” Mette Martinussen's apartment-turned-restaurant aims to make diners feel like they're attending a private dinner party.

Copenhagen’s answer to Manhattan’s posh Nobu, Umami is a French and Japanese fusion restaurant and sushi bar that has become a magnet for the celebrities and the city’s elite.

Known for its cheap beer and laid back vibe, Woodstock was the liberal freetown of Christiania's very first bar and offers beer at 16kr while allowing patrons to smoke their herb of choice outside.

Housed inside the Hotel Nimb, Michelin one-starred Restaurant Herman serves cuisine that pays tribute to the culinary traditions of the Danish countryside.

Smorrebrod (which translates as "bread and butter") is the classic Danish lunch, consisting of a piece of bread with a variety of toppings—essentially, an open-face sandwich.