Copenhagen

Restaurants in Copenhagen

In Copenhagen, you can eat well whatever your budget. Some of the country's most famous dishes are ideal for frugal travelers: the classic open-faced sandwich, the smørrebrød; Danish pastries, especially the snegl, or snail, a cinnamon treat covered in icing; and the hot dog (the organic ones at Døp are especially popular). Bakeries abound that will sell you a whole grain loaf—the essential beginning of a harbor-front picnic. But when you are ready to splurge, the city also has 13 Michelin-starred restaurants. While Americans may associate amusement parks with overpriced nachos and burgers, Tivoli Gardens is home to a number of excellent restaurants, including one of those honored with a Michelin star: Nimb. Chef Thomas Herman serves a multi-course tasting menu in the main dining room while a la carte options are available at the Brasserie overlooking Tivoli. At Noma, in the Opera House, chef Rene Redzepi takes local ingredients and turns food into theater: radishes arrive planted in malt "soil," preserved fish appear to "swim" through pancakes. This theater, however, costs more than a Broadway show with tasting menus at around $240.

Owned by four siblings, this popular Vietnamese restaurant serves cuisine heavily influenced by the culinary traditions of southern Vietnam.

The excellent bobo restaurant, housed in a 19th-century warehouse, serves reindeer over roasted organic mushrooms with berry and aniseed sauce.

Smorrebrod (which translates as "bread and butter") is the classic Danish lunch, consisting of a piece of bread with a variety of toppings—essentially, an open-face sandwich.

Frederik Hvidt is the city's rising culinary star—just ask his fellow chefs, who gather at his restaurant when their own kitchens are closed. The five-course, surprisingly affordable prix fixe menu elevates classic ingredients (lamb, cod) to their finest.

A Michelin one-starred restaurant, Formel B serves Danish and French fusion cuisine crafted by its chefs, Kristian Møller and Rune Jochumsen. Møller and Jochumsen are almost fanatical about the freshness of their ingredients, sourcing many from their own farms.

The after-work spot for theater people, this restaurant and bar is situated on a houseboat in Christianshavn.

This Michelin one-starred restaurant, housed inside a whitewashed, 17th-century cellar, serves inventive, Scandinavian-influenced French cuisine. The dining experience here is intended to be a full sensory experience, with dishes crafted to enhance taste, sight, and smell.

Café Nemoland had its beginnings as a fruit and vegetable store managed by a guy named Nemo, who used old military barracks for storage space.

Husband and wife team Rikke Malling and head chef Thorsten Schmidt have achieved notoriety with their namesake restaurant since 2005.

Book way ahead at this 1877 institution and order the halibut with truffled-egg sandwiches. To drink: a selection of four dozen aquavits.

Located in the Fredriksberg Gardens and on land belonging to the Royal Danish Garden Society, Mielcke & Hurtigkal takes a cue from nature to inspire its whimsical dining area and inventive international cuisine.

Housed in an old pharmacy, Bang and Jensen in trendy Vesterbro has a lived-in feel with mismatched, second-hand mid-century modern furniture, vintage patterned wallpaper, and an assortment of flea-market-find pantings on the wall, in addition to vintage pinball machines and game tables.