Copenhagen

Restaurants in Copenhagen

In Copenhagen, you can eat well whatever your budget. Some of the country's most famous dishes are ideal for frugal travelers: the classic open-faced sandwich, the smørrebrød; Danish pastries, especially the snegl, or snail, a cinnamon treat covered in icing; and the hot dog (the organic ones at Døp are especially popular). Bakeries abound that will sell you a whole grain loaf—the essential beginning of a harbor-front picnic. But when you are ready to splurge, the city also has 13 Michelin-starred restaurants. While Americans may associate amusement parks with overpriced nachos and burgers, Tivoli Gardens is home to a number of excellent restaurants, including one of those honored with a Michelin star: Nimb. Chef Thomas Herman serves a multi-course tasting menu in the main dining room while a la carte options are available at the Brasserie overlooking Tivoli. At Noma, in the Opera House, chef Rene Redzepi takes local ingredients and turns food into theater: radishes arrive planted in malt "soil," preserved fish appear to "swim" through pancakes. This theater, however, costs more than a Broadway show with tasting menus at around $240.

Copenhagen’s answer to Manhattan’s posh Nobu, Umami is a French and Japanese fusion restaurant and sushi bar that has become a magnet for the celebrities and the city’s elite.

Michelin-starred chef Francis Cardnau and partners Jesper Boelskifte and Erik Witting operate this popular French bistro and wine bar, just south of the Danish Museum of Art & Design.

Literally meaning "forwards and backwards," Forlaens & Baglaens is a small tapas bar serving authentic Spanish-inspired dishes predominately centered on fish and homemade breads. Tables and chairs are arranged close together in a cozy, casual atmosphere that is conducive to sharing.

This 2010 restaurant opened to raves last year inside the now-trendy former slaughterhouse complex. Despite the tile walls and meat hooks used for coat hangers, this industrial-chic space trades in seafood with an artful Scandinavian twist.

Known for its cheap beer and laid back vibe, Woodstock was the liberal freetown of Christiania's very first bar and offers beer at 16kr while allowing patrons to smoke their herb of choice outside.

Housed inside the Hotel Nimb, Michelin one-starred Restaurant Herman serves cuisine that pays tribute to the culinary traditions of the Danish countryside.

Owned by four siblings, this popular Vietnamese restaurant serves cuisine heavily influenced by the culinary traditions of southern Vietnam.

The excellent bobo restaurant, housed in a 19th-century warehouse, serves reindeer over roasted organic mushrooms with berry and aniseed sauce.

Smorrebrod (which translates as "bread and butter") is the classic Danish lunch, consisting of a piece of bread with a variety of toppings—essentially, an open-face sandwich.

Frederik Hvidt is the city's rising culinary star—just ask his fellow chefs, who gather at his restaurant when their own kitchens are closed. The five-course, surprisingly affordable prix fixe menu elevates classic ingredients (lamb, cod) to their finest.

A Michelin one-starred restaurant, Formel B serves Danish and French fusion cuisine crafted by its chefs, Kristian Møller and Rune Jochumsen. Møller and Jochumsen are almost fanatical about the freshness of their ingredients, sourcing many from their own farms.

The after-work spot for theater people, this restaurant and bar is situated on a houseboat in Christianshavn.

This Michelin one-starred restaurant, housed inside a whitewashed, 17th-century cellar, serves inventive, Scandinavian-influenced French cuisine. The dining experience here is intended to be a full sensory experience, with dishes crafted to enhance taste, sight, and smell.