Cilento Coast

Cilento Coast Travel Guide

Part of the 18th-century seaside villa that houses Le Sirenuse hotel, this upscale bar is set on an open-air terrace overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the surrounding hills.

At the peaceful piano bar in this 1962 hotel, everything from the floor-tiles to the furniture was designed by Milanese legend Gio Ponti.

Tenuta Vannulo is to mozzarella di bufala a bit what Screaming Eagle and Harlan Estate are to Cabernet Sauvignon: artisanal, scarce, legendary. At 8 a.m., people are already queueing at the doors of the bottega for cheese made just two or three hours earlier.

Made entirely in Italy, Malo is all about cashmere. This high-end brand was created in 1972 in Florence, and the original offices are still located there.

The Rufolos were Ravello’s most powerful family in the Middle Ages. Their 13th-century villa has a distinctly Moorish courtyard and is anchored by a 100-foot stone tower tinged with Islamic architectural details, signifying the long history of Arab influence in southern Italy.

Located between Sorrento and Naples, this popular latteria with a 1960's looking interior makes and sells cheese, gelato ice cream, and desserts. The selection of cheese is broad, with an emphasis on local varieties like provolone del Monaco from nearby Vico.

The recently opened gourmet store stocks everything from blood-orange marmalade and mozzarella to sauces and condiments. Raro also serves light lunches and snacks.

The 18th-century villa on the narrow Via San Nicola houses a museum that highlights even more woodwork. The gift shop sells high-end housewares and furniture by designer Alessandro Fiorentino and his three architect sons.

This spot never disappoints: the cheerfully decorated ceramics factory and garden are adorned with urns, plates, and tiles with fruits and flowers.

For a fraying-at-the-edges window into that exalted era of the 19th-century grand tour, pop into Sorrento’s “Foreigner’s Club” bar, home to the town tourist office and still patronized largely by English-speaking tourists for one very good reason: the view.

One of the Amalfi Coast’s few major “sights” in the traditional sense is the Cathedral of Sant’Andrea and its majolica-tiled bell tower, rising majestically from the top of a daunting staircase that sprouts from the main piazza.

Built into a cliff overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea, this full-service bar has a bright, simple interior and an outdoor wooden terrace, shaded by a canopy of thick-green vines.

Sorrentinos and tourists rub shoulders at the blue-and-green Bisazza-tiled bar on the main piazza. Join them for aperitifs (sparkling white wine; fresh fruit cocktails) or after-dinner drinks (limoncello or finocchietto, made with wild fennel).

The museum houses ancient artifacts, including the Coppa di Nestore (mentioned in Homer's Iliad), from the ancient Greek settlement of Pithecusae.