Cilento Coast

Cilento Coast Travel Guide

Sorrento’s main pedestrian street is lined with several shops handing out free samples of the Amalfi Coast’s famous sugary limoncello (lemon liqueur) and its creamy cousin crema di limone.

Polka-dot-handled cutlery, 1950's-style oil and vinegar cruets, and glass beakers in turquoise, yellow, and pink are just a few of the whimsical pieces at this colorful housewares store.

The Capri Palace Hotel has a candlelit al fresco bar, which is one of the few spots on the island where you can watch the sun set over the Mediterranean. Though it's always crowded, the bar is the place to be seen at aperitivo time.

Along the western coast of Italy in the Campania countryside stand the remains of this ancient Greek colony. Relatively uncommercialized, the site is home to three well-preserved Doric temples: the Temple of Hera, also called the Basilica; the Temple of Ceres (or Athena); and the Temple of Neptun

Ravello’s cathedral has an impressive pedigree, dating back to 1087, the year after Ravello was granted its own bishopric.

Part of L'Albergo della Regina Isabella, a seaside resort in Lacco Ameno, this full-service spa takes advantage of the healing mineral waters that flow from Mount Epomeo.

Watch artisans craft music boxes and elaborate inlaid tables in their ateliers. You can often buy direct from the craftsmen; otherwise comb the stores on the Via San Cesareo for a wider choice.

The domed 15th-century building was once a meeting place for nobles. Today, visitors can walk through the loggia and admire the trompe l'oeil frescoes, or just watch the locals sipping espresso and playing cards out front.

Watch Pasquale Sorrentino create everything from lamps to tabletops in a light-filled studio. Look for vases, plates, and mugs with intricate floral designs using Sorrentino's signature blue.

This storied 1960s disco installed in a sea cavern—complete with a glass floor for viewing the fish swimming below—plays up its offbeat vibe: at the height of the evening, local fishermen arrive to pull fish out of the sinkhole at the edge of the dance floor with a net.

The Stinga family have been Sorrento’s masters of wood inlay since 1890. Third-generation brothers Franco and Roberto keep the family tradition alive, meticulously crafting marquetry jewelry boxes, picture frames, and tabletops in styles from classic to strikingly modern.

Part of the 18th-century seaside villa that houses Le Sirenuse hotel, this upscale bar is set on an open-air terrace overlooking the Tyrrhenian Sea and the surrounding hills.

At the peaceful piano bar in this 1962 hotel, everything from the floor-tiles to the furniture was designed by Milanese legend Gio Ponti.