Cilento Coast

Restaurants in Cilento Coast

When Sophia Loren visited Sorrento recently, she insisted on eating at this no-frills restaurant, with simple wooden tables and plastic chairs on a portside deck that appears unaltered since the 1950’s.

Don’t let the inauspicious location—on a side street in this large modern resort town—deter you from experiencing some of the coast’s freshest seafood and best pizza.

Strolling down the Via Vittorio Emanuele extending south from Capri’s central “piazzetta,” the air fills with the sweet smell of baking waffle cones and bowls coming from the open-arch front window of Gelateria Buonocore.

Though the seafood is fresh and expertly prepared and the pizzas from the brick oven are quite good, you don’t really come here for the fairly standard cuisine.

It may be located on the lower level of a ho-hum hotel, but the food that comes out of this diminutive kitchen is anything but.

Located up a winding, stepped alleyway, the pizzeria is easy to miss; patrons often get lost looking it or stumble upon it while looking for something else.

The namesake restaurant of Hotel Lo Scoglio da Tommaso, this family-owned trattoria serves locally inspired Mediterranean fare amid panoramic views of Nerano Bay.

The colorful osteria on the dirt road that leads to Punta Licosa serves delicious local favorites and organic fresh fish.

Just west of Capri’s central “piazzetta,” Da Giorgio restaurant operates out of the hotel of the same name, serving traditional island fare like linguine with redfish sauce, scialatielli with prawns, and beef fillet in a red wine sauce.

Product curators Annamaria Cuomo and Salvatore Da Gennaro have assembled a wonderland of Campanian foodstuffs: San Marzano tomatoes handpicked in the Vesuvian soil; ricotta smoked over juniper; and the sack-shaped local raw cow’s-milk cheese provolone del Monaco, which Salvatore ages in

Don’t be fooled by the entrance, under a tunnel along the main coastal road: La Caravella has been one of the area’s finest restaurants for nearly 50 years, a required culinary stop since Federico Fellini, Andy Warhol, and Jackie Kennedy put it on the map in the 1960s.

Don’t be put off by the touristy effects (English menu; serenading guitar player). Try the tomato-filled ravioli in fish sauce, or the zucchini flowers stuffed with ricotta. But be warned: portions are nouvelle (i.e., small).

The view: Terrace tables at Rosellinis—in the Palazzo Sasso—look out on the craggy cliffs and coves of the Amalfi Coast, where fishing boats dot the cerulean waters of the Mediterranean 1,000 feet below.

On a coast where the dining choices seem divided between pretentious, overpriced temples of haute cuisine and unmemorable restaurants with their pizza ovens aimed squarely at the tourist masses, it’s refreshing to find a holdout like Da Barracca.