Cilento Coast

Restaurants in Cilento Coast

Chef Gennaro Esposito creates innovative dishes, such as risotto with cod and figs, in a seventh-century tower.

Located on a cliff in the small village of Montepertuso, this popular restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes with an emphasis on local ingredients.

For a taste of Grand-Tour glamour, stop for lunch at the sea-view restaurant inside the Grand Hotel Excelsior Vittoria. Fleets of black-tied waiters serve lobster-patty cakes and black-tea mousse with ginger on white china plates.

Family-owned for more than 40 years, this beachfront restaurant is little more than a wooden terrace set in a secluded cove on the Amalfi Coast.

In an all-but-hidden alleyway in Anacapri, on the quieter, north side of the island, the Trattoria Il Solitario takes up an outdoor garden in front of a 14th-century bell tower of the Church of Santa Sofia.

It may have slipped a notch or two from its status of celebrity hot spot in the days of Bogie and Jackie O—admittedly it’s now a bit of a tourist trap—but such a relentlessly friendly place is hard to resist.

Although the entrance to this 140-year-old trattoria in the Amalfi Coast is off a narrow backstreet, the floral, outdoor terrace on the second floor overlooks the busy Via Lorenzo and holds the most ambiance in the otherwise modestly decorated restaurant.

A key stop on any pizza tour of Italy, this eatery in the center of Vico Equense gained notoriety in the 1950's with its exceptionally long pizzas sold by the meter.

The island’s only Michelin-starred restaurant is in the Capri Palace Hotel. Dine on raw red shrimp with asparagus and apple salad followed by cuttlefish-ink ravioli.

Eat on the garden terrace, suspended almost a thousand feet above the sea in Castellabate.

Named after the three iconic rock outcrops off Capri’s south coast, this restaurant just south of the central piazzetta holds fast to tradition, not just in the simply decorated, white interior, but in the menu as well.

Since it opened in 1868, this neighborhood favorite is on only its third generation of family management, which attests to its unwavering quality—and to the longevity of the locals.

Located in the village of Ponteromito and operating since 1908, this restaurant serves traditional, regional dishes. Homemade pasta dishes, like ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with a walnut and mushroom sauce, are specialties.

Each morning, the chefs of La Cambusa purchase fresh fish and seafood from local fishermen and turn them into dishes like octopus salad, spaghetti with sautéed mussels, and linguini with lobster.

Built in a former stone quarry, this family-owned restaurant has an outdoor terrace that juts out over the Gulf of Salerno, providing views of the surrounding cliffs and the yachts floating on the water below.