Cilento Coast

Restaurants in Cilento Coast

The view: Terrace tables at Rosellinis—in the Palazzo Sasso—look out on the craggy cliffs and coves of the Amalfi Coast, where fishing boats dot the cerulean waters of the Mediterranean 1,000 feet below.

Chef Gennaro Esposito creates innovative dishes, such as risotto with cod and figs, in a seventh-century tower.

Family-owned for more than 40 years, this beachfront restaurant is little more than a wooden terrace set in a secluded cove on the Amalfi Coast.

In an all-but-hidden alleyway in Anacapri, on the quieter, north side of the island, the Trattoria Il Solitario takes up an outdoor garden in front of a 14th-century bell tower of the Church of Santa Sofia.

A key stop on any pizza tour of Italy, this eatery in the center of Vico Equense gained notoriety in the 1950's with its exceptionally long pizzas sold by the meter.

Since it opened in 1868, this neighborhood favorite is on only its third generation of family management, which attests to its unwavering quality—and to the longevity of the locals.

Built in a former stone quarry, this family-owned restaurant has an outdoor terrace that juts out over the Gulf of Salerno, providing views of the surrounding cliffs and the yachts floating on the water below.

Located in a back street off Piazza Tasso in the center of Sorrento, this restaurant serves traditional Mediterranean and Neapolitan cuisine.

Though the seafood is fresh and expertly prepared and the pizzas from the brick oven are quite good, you don’t really come here for the fairly standard cuisine.

The namesake restaurant of Hotel Lo Scoglio da Tommaso, this family-owned trattoria serves locally inspired Mediterranean fare amid panoramic views of Nerano Bay.

Don’t be fooled by the entrance, under a tunnel along the main coastal road: La Caravella has been one of the area’s finest restaurants for nearly 50 years, a required culinary stop since Federico Fellini, Andy Warhol, and Jackie Kennedy put it on the map in the 1960s.

On a coast where the dining choices seem divided between pretentious, overpriced temples of haute cuisine and unmemorable restaurants with their pizza ovens aimed squarely at the tourist masses, it’s refreshing to find a holdout like Da Barracca.

Positano’s most stylish bar and restaurant serves freshly made, regionally sourced dishes—like fried ravioli with ricotta and mozzarella on a bed of fresh tomatoes—in a slick interior with floor cushions and a softly lit courtyard.