China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

“Father of the Nation” Sun Yat-Sen was a member of the “Hakka” people, migratory Han Chinese who speak their own language and maintain their own, unique cultural traditions. Visit this Dongcheng neighborhood restaurant to taste their traditional approach to food.

The Uighur people bring their northwest Chinese flavors to this glass-fronted restaurant. Chinese Western Muslim music sets the rowdy atmosphere inside; the singing and dancing waiters occasionally also dance with diners.

Order the steak tartare and a side of chef Gray Kunz’s signature house-made ketchup or sea bass in ginger bouillon while taking in the amazing harbor views at the ultra-glam dining room atop the Upper House hotel. The $37 lunch prix fixe, which changes seasonally, is a stellar value.

“Only natural” is the mission at this Causeway Bay spot that specializes in bread, coffee, and snacks. MSG, additives and colorings are shunned by the bakers; natural ingredients alone go into loaves of cheese yoghurt and raisin sourdough bread.

Cuisine from the southern Hunan region is known for its smoke, spice, and rich color. This Jing’an neighborhood restaurant’s reputation precedes it, so it’s often crowded.

There’s no need to settle for just one restaurant at this Kowloon food mall, part of the Wonderful Worlds of Whampoa. Across from the cruise ship-shaped Whampoa shopping center, this high-rise houses an assortment of dining options.

The menu here is worth the harrowing squeeze into the tiny dining room.

At the 16-seat counter at the industrial-chic restaurant diners watch Jean Georges–trained chef Makoto Ono prepare a seven-course omakase meal in an open kitchen.

Famed Chinese author Lu Xun wrote a short story about a student/vagrant named Kong Jiyi whose love of the bottle kept him from earning his degree.