China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

The story goes like this: three painters from Guizhou, a poor south central province, came to Beijing seeking to earn a fortune with their brushes. They soon realized their Sichuan fare could fill a void in the city, and Three Guizhou Men was born.

Although located on the second floor of the Xintiandi shopping mall, this restaurant is far from the typical food court options found in malls. Bright red poles line the entrance, and noodle crafters can be seen shaping noodles from dough in the La Mian style.

Drawing such former guests as Jackie Chan, this Michelin two-starred restaurant serves gourmet Cantonese cuisine inside the Langham Hong Kong hotel.

Perched atop the 66th floor of the Park Hyatt hotel, China Grill provides diners an unparalleled vantage point of the city that includes views of the CCTV Tower, World Trade Center, and Changan Avenue.

A number of restaurants offer views of West Lake, but this one stands out with its covered terrace and extensive menu featuring dishes from throughout China. Regional specialties include longjing xiaren, shrimp cooked with longjing tea.

Yu

There’s nothing better than fresh fruit on a plane. Stop at this clean kiosk—which sells fruit by weight or prepackaged—for mangoes, dragon fruit, green apples, and more.

The dark, Deco-y Shanghainese restaurant serves roast duck wrapped in mantou buns, kao fu, a warm, brown, bready, tofu-like rice-gluten substance that is very comforting; and steamed fish head.

Nine lights at the end of a cement staircase make up the unmarked entrance to this trendy restaurant and bar. Once the mystery of entrance is solved, a modern gray interior is the setting for contemporary Chinese cuisine.

Kee

Designed by a New Yorker, this edgy lounge and restaurant is definitely not for the whole family. Bold canvases, antique opium beds, and polished concrete set a trendy yet chill atmosphere inside this alley location in an old siheyuan, or multi-building house with a central courtyard.