Restaurants in China

Babbo alumnus Vinny Lauria serves hearty Italian standards—beef carpaccio; bucatini all’amatriciana; Neapolitan-style pizza—against a backdrop of toile-patterned walls and solid walnut floors.

“Fine cuisine” is not usually the first thing that pops to mind when talking about the government. In this case though, the Sichuan provincial office hosts a restaurant, highlighting the fiery spice of Sichuan fare. Each province is represented by an official restaurant in Beijing.

This restaurant on the sixth floor of the Four Seasons Hong Kong has established itself as a French cuisine authority in Hong Kong, earning three Michelin stars in 2011 and 2012.

The lonely expat from Italy needn’t look far for a taste of the homeland, since this Causeway Bay restaurant brings in fresh ingredients from Rome on a weekly basis. Diners don’t go for the ambience or presentation, as neither are emphasized.

The famous Longjing tea leaves from the Hangzhou region make the stir-fried freshwater shrimp taste sweet and earthy, but the star of the show is missing from the English side of the menu—the smoked yellow croaker, an unremarkable, bottom-dwelling creature that, in the hands of the Tin Heung Lau


Chinese artist Fang Lijun dips his brush into both the culinary and visual arts, and this Lotus Lane restaurant is an example of his work as a restaurateur. While Fang’s visual art is harshly real, the Hunan food at this Lotus Lane restaurant is far from it.

Wake up with coffee and green tea ice cream! Starbucks’s comfy booths and free Wi-Fi are welcome before a long flight. Buy a Starbucks-branded Great Wall mug ($13) and a grande cappuccino ($4), or stop next door at Häagen-Dazs for a small cone ($4).

Classic Shanghainese food in a French Concession villa.

The über-chic modern dining room and towering, panoramic harbor views are stunning, but the cuisine—half Japanese, half Italian—is just as bold, with a structural integrity that gives the vistas a run for their money.