China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

This venue is closed.

Located on the first floor of the Peninsula Hong Kong hotel, this upscale Cantonese restaurant is designed to reflect the history of the Peninsula, which first opened in 1928.

From the lightly provocative art by Mao Tong Qiang (the iconic Iwo Jima soldiers hoisting a gigantic dollar symbol instead of the Stars and Stripes) to the timber-paneled red-wine cellar to the burgundy velvet armchairs to the sleek Laguiole knives to the soon-to-come rooftop garden (cigars!), Cé

Facing the lake, the Hyatt Regency's atmospheric, antiques-filled restaurant serves classic Hangzhou fare, such as beggar's chicken and Dongpo rou-a fork-tender pork dish named after the city's 11th-century poet Su Dongpo.

In 1918, Wing On was one of four Nanjing Road department stores that helped define Shanghai as the Paris of the Far East. Now it houses Xian Qiang Fang, which is a perfect balance of old and new, with its green-marble vestibule and Art Deco dining room.

Y's

The menu at Source changes every two weeks, but it can be relied on for one thing: tongue-numbing Sichuan fare. Housed in the former home of a Qing general, this quiet Dongcheng restaurant has a lush courtyard that is home to date trees and a famously old pomegranate tree.

When it comes to cheap Chinese eats, Mia’s offers many fresher, healthier alternative to heavy dumplings and noodles.  Quaint and inexpensive, the restaurant serves exotic dishes that represent several minority populations in the southwestern Yunnan province—including The mint-infused salad

This retro-style, greasy-spoon Hong Kong diner is always jam-packed with young locals, who patiently wait an hour so they can split a table with strangers. Well worth the wait, Cha’s serves Shanghai’s most authentic Cantonese comfort food and diner-style sandwiches.

Originating in Lanzhou province, the local dish known as lamian (meaning “pulled noodle”) is a generous serving of noodles in a giant bowl of fragrant beef broth.

Four Seasons devotes itself to the hearty staple of the northern (Dongbei) diet: big, rustic dumplings.

With two locations in the heart of the city, Di Shui Dong is a longtime favorite for Shanghai locals and expats. It’s not exactly known for its polished service or décor; in fact, the ambience here is slightly seedy.

You haven’t had a proper Shanghai brunch until you’ve dug into plates of duck-fat French fries and eggs Benedict at Madison.