China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

The restaurant, overlooking the harbor, serves delightful sweet barbecued pork buns, steamed rice-flour cannelloni with diced scallop and crabmeat, and crispy spring rolls with shredded chicken and the glorious zing of pickles.

Babbo alumnus Vinny Lauria serves hearty Italian standards—beef carpaccio; bucatini all’amatriciana; Neapolitan-style pizza—against a backdrop of toile-patterned walls and solid walnut floors.

Hidden among the back alleys of Beijing and within the Dongcheng neighborhood, the Dali Courtyard offers a quaint outdoor setting and authentic Yunnanese cuisine. Food from the southern province of Yunnan utilizes the herbs of the region, as well as the mushrooms it’s known for.

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There’s nothing better than fresh fruit on a plane. Stop at this clean kiosk—which sells fruit by weight or prepackaged—for mangoes, dragon fruit, green apples, and more.

The dark, Deco-y Shanghainese restaurant serves roast duck wrapped in mantou buns, kao fu, a warm, brown, bready, tofu-like rice-gluten substance that is very comforting; and steamed fish head.

Nine lights at the end of a cement staircase make up the unmarked entrance to this trendy restaurant and bar. Once the mystery of entrance is solved, a modern gray interior is the setting for contemporary Chinese cuisine.

The straightforward fast-food menu of Chinese comfort staples here includes congee rice porridge with chicken, fried tofu with scallions (an ideal savory breakfast), wonton soup with scallops, barbecue pork, and choy sum vegetables in hot broth.

On Beijing's oldest commercial street, established China restaurateur Michelle Garnaut draws the city's glitterati with seasonal, locally sourced dishes such as wild-mushroom-and-truffle risotto.

In Vietnamese, Song means "to live,” and this central district restaurant gives life to Indochinese and Vietnamese fare. The interior is casual but intimate with comfortable chairs and soft light.

Owner Lau Kin Wai once critiqued the work of artists; now he scrutinizes culinary art and invites diners to form their own opinion of the Cantonese fare at his Tin Hau neighborhood restaurant.