China

Restaurants in China

The most fabulous of the restaurants in the sprawling China World Hotel, Aria attracts a hip, well-dressed, and largely Western-expat crowd.

Perched in the middle of a man-made lake, the path to this house twists and turns (legend says spirits don’t do curves.) Also known as “Huxin Ting,” this two-story building with traditional Chinese architecture was built in the Qing Dynasty and turned teahouse in 1855.

Owned by world-famous chef Alain Ducasse, this Michelin two-starred restaurant is located on the ground floor of the InterContinental Hotel, overlooking Victoria Harbour.

A spacious, wood-accented respite from the bustling departures area, this café offers dramatic views over the runways and the South China Sea, and live jazz music on most nights.

Located on the second floor of the Intercontinental Hotel, this Japanese restaurant takes its namesake from chef Nobu Matsuhisa. Japanese design elements dominate the interior, including the ceiling that resembles sea urchin texture and a cherry blossom motif at the bar.

This convention center–size favorite is still everything you want: bustle, extended families, and a never-ending parade of steaming carts proferring crisp taro puffs, steamed king prawns, and chicken feet braised to a dark, burnished tan.

Not all of Hong Kong’s notable restaurants are in the heart of the city; this one—famous for its fresh, reasonably priced seafood—is located in the fishing village of Sai Kung, northeast of the metropolis.

“Upscale with a kick” is one way to describe this Dongzhimenwai neighborhood restaurant, which opened in 2003 and is one of many locations throughout China.

Former organic farmer Tam Keung puts a locavore spin on rice porridge. The fish are raised in his pond and the soy sauce is house-made.

This small shop was originally intended to sell handmade crafts, but the owner found so many people stopping in looking for coffee that he decided to make it a coffee shop.

Some say this restaurant in the Grand Hyatt rests atop Beijing’s food pyramid. Made in China's ground-floor Dongcheng neighborhood location focuses on northern Chinese fare. Wood, steel, and an open kitchen behind glass set the atmosphere inside this 126-seat glitzy space.

"This is a 24-hours restaurant that serves Cantonese cuisine, mainly in small dim sum portions. It's a great place for people-watching, too. The shrimp dumplings, stewed beef with radish, and spare ribs with black bean sauce are some of my favorites.