China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

Central Hong Kong neighborhood restaurant Goccia serves Southern Italian cuisine. The bi-level eatery has ambient lighting, panoramic picture windows, orange leather chairs, and banquette seating on the main floor. Outdoor terrace dining is also available.

For authentic local food, try the 20-course small-bite tasting menu, including duck sesame buns.

This high-design hot spot in a converted siheyuan (courtyard home) is the latest offering from chef Jereme Leung—already well known in Shanghai for taking traditional cuisine and turning it on its head.

Designed by a New Yorker, this edgy lounge and restaurant is definitely not for the whole family. Bold canvases, antique opium beds, and polished concrete set a trendy yet chill atmosphere inside this alley location in an old siheyuan, or multi-building house with a central courtyard.

In 1918, Wing On was one of four Nanjing Road department stores that helped define Shanghai as the Paris of the Far East. Now it houses Xian Qiang Fang, which is a perfect balance of old and new, with its green-marble vestibule and Art Deco dining room.

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The menu at Source changes every two weeks, but it can be relied on for one thing: tongue-numbing Sichuan fare. Housed in the former home of a Qing general, this quiet Dongcheng restaurant has a lush courtyard that is home to date trees and a famously old pomegranate tree.

This venue is closed.

Located on the first floor of the Peninsula Hong Kong hotel, this upscale Cantonese restaurant is designed to reflect the history of the Peninsula, which first opened in 1928.

From the lightly provocative art by Mao Tong Qiang (the iconic Iwo Jima soldiers hoisting a gigantic dollar symbol instead of the Stars and Stripes) to the timber-paneled red-wine cellar to the burgundy velvet armchairs to the sleek Laguiole knives to the soon-to-come rooftop garden (cigars!), Cé

Facing the lake, the Hyatt Regency's atmospheric, antiques-filled restaurant serves classic Hangzhou fare, such as beggar's chicken and Dongpo rou-a fork-tender pork dish named after the city's 11th-century poet Su Dongpo.

If you must eat a meal before you get on the plane, choose carefully as the Beijing Airport’s options are middling at best. Prik Thai is the top Asian choice. Sit and look out over the ticketing hall next to a faux gold–topped Wat temple set among potted palms and silk-shaded lamps.

Chef Paul Pairet's lively, modern French restaurant offers all-day people-watching. The staff is knowledgeable and the food delicious; try the steak and foie gras.

This leisurely coffee shop is Asia’s answer to Starbucks; sip tea, sit under slow-moving wooden fans and imagine the Repulse Bay beach scene 80 years ago.