China

Restaurants in China

There’s no need to settle for just one restaurant at this Kowloon food mall, part of the Wonderful Worlds of Whampoa. Across from the cruise ship-shaped Whampoa shopping center, this high-rise houses an assortment of dining options.

The menu here is worth the harrowing squeeze into the tiny dining room.

At the 16-seat counter at the industrial-chic restaurant diners watch Jean Georges–trained chef Makoto Ono prepare a seven-course omakase meal in an open kitchen.

Founder Kam Shui Fai’s reputation for roasted goose began at his humble street-side food stall before the onset of World War II. From that beginning grew the business that would one day earn the chef a Michelin star three years in a row.

Atop the gaudy Sheraton hotel in Kowloon, the Oyster & Wine Bar sells 800 oysters a day, and imports them from all over the planet.

Ubiquitous chain with English menus and solid xiao long bao. Various locations.

This airy, hushed dining room, with its plush chairs and small pond fed by a tinkling waterfall, is the place to linger over lunch in Wan Chai.

Chef de cuisine Franckelie Laloum, formerly of Michelin three-starred Maison Pic and Maison Troisgros, brings his top-shelf experience to this French restaurant on the 36th floor of the Pudong Shangri-La hotel.

Famed Chinese author Lu Xun wrote a short story about a student/vagrant named Kong Jiyi whose love of the bottle kept him from earning his degree.

The convivial atmosphere and tender duck pancakes make it one of the top places to try Beijing's most famous dish, peking duck.

LAN

Treat yourself to an over-the-top dinner at the Philippe Starck-designed LAN, full of Baroque accents and crowd-pleasing dishes (oysters in spicy-sauce; stir-fried lobster).

Located in the city's SoHo district, Lotus is self-labeled as modern Thai. The front of the restaurant is open-air, making it great for watching the crowds, while the exposed brick and high ceilings are reminiscent of a big-city loft.