China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

The 25th floor of the Mandarin Oriental offers a taste of contemporary French fare from well-known chef Pierre Gagnaire. Chef de cuisine Nicolas Boujema (a student of Gagnaire) leads the culinary efforts, earning the restaurant two Michelin stars in 2011 and 2012.

Classic Shanghainese food in a French Concession villa.

The über-chic modern dining room and towering, panoramic harbor views are stunning, but the cuisine—half Japanese, half Italian—is just as bold, with a structural integrity that gives the vistas a run for their money.

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Chinese artist Fang Lijun dips his brush into both the culinary and visual arts, and this Lotus Lane restaurant is an example of his work as a restaurateur. While Fang’s visual art is harshly real, the Hunan food at this Lotus Lane restaurant is far from it.

Wake up with coffee and green tea ice cream! Starbucks’s comfy booths and free Wi-Fi are welcome before a long flight. Buy a Starbucks-branded Great Wall mug ($13) and a grande cappuccino ($4), or stop next door at Häagen-Dazs for a small cone ($4).

Part restaurant and part nightclub, Dragon-i draws a seemingly endless parade of models and A-list celebrities, with past guests including David Beckham, Jude Law, and Naomi Campbell.

Kowloon may not be the first place you’d expect to find Nordic seafood, but “Food, Ideas, Nightlife, Drinks, and Service” aims to provide sea-dwelling fare from Finland, Iceland, Norway, Denmark and Sweden.

"This Bellagio is not a Las Vegas hotel, but a faux-swanky Taiwanese brasserie. There are several locations in Shanghai, and they're all open at all hours.

The historic Union Building became “Three on the Bund” in 2004, and the fifth floor houses the 120-seat Whampoa Club. Located inside one of the Financial Street district's last siheyuan (courtyards), the restaurant has an Art Deco interior with gold and red tones and a lotus pond.

Qu Nar Restaurant (the name means "Where are you going?" in Mandarin) is well hidden down an alley off a main Beijing road: It looks like a bunker on the outside, but the unremarkable interior includes projected art by the owner, Ai Weiwei (the artist who designed the Bird’s Nest stadium for the

The story goes like this: three painters from Guizhou, a poor south central province, came to Beijing seeking to earn a fortune with their brushes. They soon realized their Sichuan fare could fill a void in the city, and Three Guizhou Men was born.