China

Restaurants in China

China's cuisine is amazingly complex and multi-faceted and travelers will find restaurants in China that specialize in all the various regional styles of cooking. The best restaurants in China range from some that offer white-glove service and banquets with countless courses to humble stalls that may sell only one particular broth or noodle dish. Peking duck is, of course, one of China's most famous dishes and the Dadong Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing is one of the best places to taste the duck exactly as it should be prepared and served, in three courses. 

The Donglaishun restaurants began as a food stall in 1903, but now they are famous for their Mongolian hotpots where diners cook their own meat (traditionally, thinly sliced mutton) and vegetables in a tableside pot of broth. The China restaurants scenes isn't limited to just Chinese fare. Miichelle Garnault's M restaurants (M on the Bund in Shanghai, M on the Fringe in Hong Kong, and M Capital in Beijing) are some of the most acclaimed of the many using locally sourced ingredients in European—and Middle Eastern and North African—dishes.

Located on the first floor of the Peninsula Hong Kong hotel, this upscale Cantonese restaurant is designed to reflect the history of the Peninsula, which first opened in 1928.

Japanese architect Sakea Miura designed this bunker-like restaurant, which was once a movie theater for retired government officials. Guests enter down a concrete walkway through a bamboo garden and by Shintori’s sole sign, a large white stone.

Soup noodles with braised brisket, sweet spices, and tangerine peel is a steal at just $2.

Part of the Elite Concepts group, this restaurant has sister locations in Hong Kong and Kowloon. Housed in a brick mansion in the Xintiandi district, the interior has a nostalgic vibe with mid-century decorations and traditional artwork.

If you must eat a meal before you get on the plane, choose carefully as the Beijing Airport’s options are middling at best. Prik Thai is the top Asian choice. Sit and look out over the ticketing hall next to a faux gold–topped Wat temple set among potted palms and silk-shaded lamps.

Chef Paul Pairet's lively, modern French restaurant offers all-day people-watching. The staff is knowledgeable and the food delicious; try the steak and foie gras.

This leisurely coffee shop is Asia’s answer to Starbucks; sip tea, sit under slow-moving wooden fans and imagine the Repulse Bay beach scene 80 years ago.

China is a popular place for tea so it’s no surprise that teahouses abound across the country. After a flight of stairs to the second floor, this Old Shanghai establishment opens up and surrounds tea-lovers with an array of antiques, such as maps and posters from the 1930’s and 1940’s.

“Father of the Nation” Sun Yat-Sen was a member of the “Hakka” people, migratory Han Chinese who speak their own language and maintain their own, unique cultural traditions. Visit this Dongcheng neighborhood restaurant to taste their traditional approach to food.

The Uighur people bring their northwest Chinese flavors to this glass-fronted restaurant. Chinese Western Muslim music sets the rowdy atmosphere inside; the singing and dancing waiters occasionally also dance with diners.

Order the steak tartare and a side of chef Gray Kunz’s signature house-made ketchup or sea bass in ginger bouillon while taking in the amazing harbor views at the ultra-glam dining room atop the Upper House hotel. The $37 lunch prix fixe, which changes seasonally, is a stellar value.

Owned by world-famous chef Alain Ducasse, this Michelin two-starred restaurant is located on the ground floor of the InterContinental Hotel, overlooking Victoria Harbour.