China

Restaurants in China

Chinese artist Fang Lijun dips his brush into both the culinary and visual arts, and this Lotus Lane restaurant is an example of his work as a restaurateur. While Fang’s visual art is harshly real, the Hunan food at this Lotus Lane restaurant is far from it.

Wake up with coffee and green tea ice cream! Starbucks’s comfy booths and free Wi-Fi are welcome before a long flight. Buy a Starbucks-branded Great Wall mug ($13) and a grande cappuccino ($4), or stop next door at Häagen-Dazs for a small cone ($4).

Classic Shanghainese food in a French Concession villa.

The über-chic modern dining room and towering, panoramic harbor views are stunning, but the cuisine—half Japanese, half Italian—is just as bold, with a structural integrity that gives the vistas a run for their money.

RBL

This extensive salad buffet is ideal for scoring healthy pre-flight nibbles. There’s plenty of self-seating for those with time to spare, while travelers on the run can grab soups and noodles, and desserts such as a Japanese-style cheesecake.

Here, the plump bird is presented in heated rosewood boxes in an intimate dining room.

For an authentic Peking Duck experience, locals swear by Dadong, just a 10-minute walk from Chaoyang Park Beach. After a complex process of inflating and drying their skins, the birds are roasted in fruitwood-fueled brick ovens.

This ground-floor restaurant in the Star Street district showcases owner Jacky Yu’s love for food and arts, not just with desserts like the moniker suggests, but also with savory Chinese-fusion dishes. The dining area has light woods accents contrasted with red walls.

This venue is closed.

Qi

When counting in Chinese, “qi” means “seven,” and this intimate restaurant offers fare from seven provinces, including Sichuan. The small space on the second floor of the Ritz-Carlton Financial Street in the Chaoyang district has seven private rooms of varying sizes.