Restaurants in China

Cuisine from the southern Hunan region is known for its smoke, spice, and rich color. This Jing’an neighborhood restaurant’s reputation precedes it, so it’s often crowded.

There’s no need to settle for just one restaurant at this Kowloon food mall, part of the Wonderful Worlds of Whampoa. Across from the cruise ship-shaped Whampoa shopping center, this high-rise houses an assortment of dining options.

Ubiquitous chain with English menus and solid xiao long bao. Various locations.

This airy, hushed dining room, with its plush chairs and small pond fed by a tinkling waterfall, is the place to linger over lunch in Wan Chai.

Chef de cuisine Franckelie Laloum, formerly of Michelin three-starred Maison Pic and Maison Troisgros, brings his top-shelf experience to this French restaurant on the 36th floor of the Pudong Shangri-La hotel.

Famed Chinese author Lu Xun wrote a short story about a student/vagrant named Kong Jiyi whose love of the bottle kept him from earning his degree.

Founder Kam Shui Fai’s reputation for roasted goose began at his humble street-side food stall before the onset of World War II. From that beginning grew the business that would one day earn the chef a Michelin star three years in a row.

Atop the gaudy Sheraton hotel in Kowloon, the Oyster & Wine Bar sells 800 oysters a day, and imports them from all over the planet.

The most fabulous of the restaurants in the sprawling China World Hotel, Aria attracts a hip, well-dressed, and largely Western-expat crowd.

Perched in the middle of a man-made lake, the path to this house twists and turns (legend says spirits don’t do curves.) Also known as “Huxin Ting,” this two-story building with traditional Chinese architecture was built in the Qing Dynasty and turned teahouse in 1855.

Owned by world-famous chef Alain Ducasse, this Michelin two-starred restaurant is located on the ground floor of the InterContinental Hotel, overlooking Victoria Harbour.

A spacious, wood-accented respite from the bustling departures area, this café offers dramatic views over the runways and the South China Sea, and live jazz music on most nights.

The convivial atmosphere and tender duck pancakes make it one of the top places to try Beijing's most famous dish, peking duck.


Treat yourself to an over-the-top dinner at the Philippe Starck-designed LAN, full of Baroque accents and crowd-pleasing dishes (oysters in spicy-sauce; stir-fried lobster).